Emergency Operations Plan

INTRODUCTION

To:       All San Miguel County Department Heads and Elected Officials All Affiliated Organizations, Agencies and Jurisdictions

This document serves as the formal declaration and announcement of the issuance of the current San Miguel County Emergency Operation Plan). This plan is intended to provide officials and critical stakeholders with a basis for the coordinated management of disaster incidents in order to preserve life, property and natural resources, and to minimize the impacts of the disaster on the community in order to resume daily county operations and community conditions as quickly as possible.

In San Miguel County, the management of emergencies begins well before they strike, through collaborative planning and capacity building. The public, private, and non-profit sectors, as well as individual citizens, must work together to prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from the threats and hazards that pose a risk to San Miguel County.

All stakeholder participating in the emergency management activities of preparedness, mitigation, response and recovery are to follow the concepts and coordination systems specified in this plan and supporting Annexes.

The plan has been designed to serve to coordinate the activities of various organizations. Nothing in this plan is intended to interfere with the delivery of the organizations’ primary services, though during a crisis resources may have to be temporarily redirected for the public good. A local disaster declaration may be issued to address those issues.

While this plan serves as a policy level and guidance document, it is recognized that each incident is unique and may require some variations in implementation.

Upon authorization, this plan may be fully or partially activated to manage natural, technological and human-caused incidents that occur. All San Miguel County employees shall support this plan and carry out their responsibilities as required by this document.

San Miguel County Board of County Commissioners June 8, 2022

 

ADOPTION

The current San Miguel County Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) was adopted by the San Miguel County Board of County Commissioners per Resolution 2022-17. 

PURPOSE

This EOP serves a link between special districts, local municipalities, San Miguel County, the State of Colorado through the Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management, and the State Emergency Operations Center. The plan also ties in the federal government using the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s established National Response Framework.

The purpose of the EOP is to provide general guidelines and principles for planning, managing, and coordinating the overall response and recovery activities of San Miguel County before, during and after major events. This includes major events that affect unincorporated areas of the county. Incorporated areas of the county are highly encouraged to update their existing emergency plans regularly.

The overall goal of this plan is to coordinate the roles, resources and responsibilities of county agencies, departments and other stakeholders to ensure a rapid, flexible response to any disaster, critical incident or planned event. To facilitate this goal, the EOP utilizes the all-hazards preparedness and planning approach, which is consistent with federal guidelines.

This is a plan, not a procedural document. The contents of the EOP are intended to provide a basis for the coordinated planning and management of the types of emergencies and disaster events most likely to occur in the County. The EOP is not intended to outline specific operational or functional procedures. Instead, this document consolidates the various policies and considerations that affect the development of procedures. In short, this is the ‘what’, not the ‘how.’

Major emergencies and disaster incidents are unique events that present communities and emergency personnel with extraordinary problems and challenges that cannot be adequately addressed within the routine operations of local government. Since disasters differ in important ways and it is impossible to plan for every contingency, highly detailed operational procedures that can quickly become out of date are avoided in this plan in favor of a streamlined, all hazards preparedness approach.

San Miguel County Emergency Management has developed this EOP for incidents that surpass the response capabilities of any one jurisdiction. The EOP provides a flexible blueprint for addressing major emergencies. It unifies County agencies and community partners in a common goal to prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from the threats and hazards that pose a risk to San Miguel County.

The EOP is intended to provide San Miguel County officials, department heads and stakeholders with a basis for the coordinated management of disaster incidents so that impacts to people, property, the environment, public services and economy are minimized and so that normal community conditions can be restored as quickly as possible. The plan does this by:

  • Identifying the roles, responsibilities and actions of county departments and offices, participating agencies and special districts during the response to emergencies and disasters.
  • Providing a framework for coordination and integration of emergency plans of municipalities and special districts as well as working with state and federal agencies.
  • Establishing a system for coordinating the five phases of Emergency Management: Prevention, Protection, Response, Recovery and Mitigation.

This plan does not address emergency planning and management of towns or special districts. These political subdivisions are responsible for the development and maintenance of their Emergency Operations Plans (EOPs) and Annexes, standard operating procedures and training necessary for implementing assigned duties and functions of their jurisdiction’s EOP. The Plan is designed to work in concert with departmental standard operating guidelines, town, regional, and the State of Colorado EOPs.

PLANNING CONTACT INFORMATION

For all information pertaining to this plan, contact:

Shannon Armstrong, Emergency Manager San Miguel County Sheriff’s Office

684 CR 63L, Telluride, CO 81423

970-369-8628 | em@sanmiguelsheriff.org

SCOPE

The EOP applies to all incidents or events within the geographic boundaries of San Miguel County. The EOP also applies to any event that may affect the County regardless of location or size. This includes events in neighboring jurisdictions, large-scale events within the State of Colorado or any situation where the County may be called upon for mutual aid. The Emergency Operations Plan and supporting annexes are in effect at all times.

The EOP embraces the concept of scalability and therefore may be expanded or contracted to suit any size, scope, scale, or magnitude of events, including catastrophic incidents. While the plan is not intended for use in the response to or recovery from incidents that are considered part of the daily operating procedures, the plan may be helpful if standard events coincide and cause a strain on the County’s resources.

San Miguel County is responsible for emergency response operations in all unincorporated areas of the County and in cooperation with all jurisdictions located within the County. The statutory responsibility for the management of an emergency or disaster in Colorado rests with the duly elected leadership of each jurisdiction.

The level of coordination between the County and the local jurisdictions varies based on the planning procedures and capabilities of each jurisdiction. Each local jurisdiction is responsible for developing, maintaining and exercising its local EOP. Emergency Management staff is available to all jurisdictions to assist in planning efforts around the development, review, and exercising of said plans, whenever possible. The following jurisdictions are within the San Miguel County political boundary:

  • San Miguel County
  • Town of Norwood (Municipal Corporation)
  • Town of Ophir (Home Rule Municipality)
  • Town of Sawpit (Municipal Corporation)
  • Town of Telluride (Home Rule Municipality)
  • Town of Mountain Village (Home Rule Municipality)
  • Egnar-Slick Rock Fire Protection District
  • Norwood/Redvale Fire Protection District
  • Telluride Fire Protection District

BASE PLAN

This base EOP describes the structure and processes comprising a countywide approach to incident management designed to integrate the efforts and resources of local governments, private sector and non-governmental organizations. Town governments, special districts, and non-governmental organizations should maintain and update their jurisdictional or response area emergency operations plans on an ongoing basis. Basic roles and responsibilities are outlined in this plan for coordination purposes. This base plan is adopted by the San Miguel County Board of Commissioners (BOCC) and does not change without their approval.

SUPPORTING ANNEXES

The Annexes to the EOP detail the policies, structures, and responsibilities for coordinating support to local agencies or other jurisdictions and entities during incidents. Annexes in support of this EOP are both functional based and scenario based. As incidents and exercises occur, these Annexes are subject to change to improve response capabilities. New Annexes may be added as needed. As of the date of adoption of this document, the following Annexes are complete and current; a link to the current San Miguel County Annexes may be found in the county and Sheriff’s Office network folders.

  • Evacuation Guide
  • Mass Care and Shelter Guide
  • EOC Management Guide
  • Interoperable Communication Guide
  • Alert and Information Management Guide
  • Hazardous Materials Response Guide
  • Dam Failure Response Guide

WHOLE COMMUNITY

This plan was developed based on the concept of “whole community.” This means that it takes the entire community to effectively plan for, prepare for, protect and mitigate against, respond to and recover from disasters. Whole community also means that every resident and visitor, including those with learning disabilities, physical disabilities and/or access and functional needs (AFN) should be considered in all phases of planning.

Residents can help build resilient communities by taking individual responsibility and by being proactive to mitigate hazards around their homes and ensure their personal and loved ones’ safety. For more information visit Ready.gov.

AUTHORITIES

This EOP is aligned to be consistent with those requirements set forth in the State of Colorado Title 24, Article 33.5, Part 701 et. seq., Colorado Revised Statutes, as amended; entitled the Colorado Disaster Emergency Act. It is also aligned with the National Response Framework (NRF) and National Incident Management System (NIMS).

The Board of County Commissioners has the authority to declare, continue or discontinue a disaster or emergency in San Miguel County, provide for any and all of the disaster and emergency powers permitted by the state, by local laws and resolution. Nothing in this EOP or the supporting annexes shall abridge or curtail the authority of the BOCC.

Independently elected officials will endeavor to fully comply with the EOP as detailed and consistent with their statutory and constitutional obligations of office. The base EOP is adopted by the BOCC by resolution, which serves as the promulgation letter for this plan.

FEDERAL

  1. The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 as Amended by the ADA Amendments Act of2008
    1. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) provides broad nondiscrimination protection for individuals with disabilities in employment, public services, and public accommodations and services operated by private entities. Although the ADA does not include provisions specifically discussing its application to disasters, its nondiscrimination provisions are applicable to emergency preparedness and responses to disasters.
  2. Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD) 5: Management of Domestic Incidents, 2003.
    1. The purpose of this directive is to enhance the ability of the United States to manage domestic incidents by establishing a single, comprehensive national incident management system
  3. Homeland Security Act of 2002
    1. Establishes a Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as an executive department of the United States, headed by a Secretary of Homeland Security (Secretary) appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to: (1) prevent terrorist attacks within the United States; (2) reduce the vulnerability of the United States to terrorism; (3) minimize the damage, and assist in the recovery, from terrorist attacks that occur within the United States; (4) carry out all functions of entities transferred to DHS; (5) ensure that the functions of the agencies and subdivisions within DHS that are not related directly to securing the homeland are not diminished or neglected except by a specific Act of Congress; (6) ensure that the overall economic security of the United States is not diminished by efforts, activities, and programs aimed at securing the homeland; and (7) monitor connections between illegal drug trafficking and terrorism, coordinate efforts to sever such connections, and otherwise contribute to efforts to interdict illegal drug trafficking.
  4. Post Katrina Reform Act
    1. Amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to make extensive revisions to emergency response provisions while keeping FEMA within the DHS. The act sets forth provisions regarding FEMA's mission, which shall include: (1) leading the nation's efforts to prepare for, respond to, recover from, and mitigate the risks of, any natural and man-made disaster, including catastrophic incidents; (2) implementing a risk-based, all hazards plus strategy for preparedness; and (3) promoting and planning for the protection, security, resiliency, and post-disaster restoration of critical infrastructure and key resources, including cyber and communications assets.
  5. Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act of 2006
    1. Amends the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act to ensure that State and local emergency preparedness operational plans address the needs of individuals with household pets and service animals following a major disaster or emergency.
  6. HSPD-8: National Preparedness
    1. This directive is aimed at strengthening the security and resilience of the United States through systematic preparation for the threats that pose the greatest risk to the security of the nation, including acts of terrorism, cyber-attacks, pandemics and catastrophic natural disasters.
  7. Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act and Amendment
  8. National Response Framework (NRF), updated 2019
  9. National Disaster Recovery Framework, 2011 (NDRF)
  10. National Incident Management System (NIMS)
  11. Comprehensive Preparedness Guide (CPG) 101, v.2.0, FEMA, 2010 - Developing and Maintaining Emergency Operations plans
  12. Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA)
    1. If a release of an Extremely Hazardous Substance (EHS) at or above its applicable reportable quantity, the facility must notify the State Emergency Response Commission (SERC) and Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC) for any area(s) likely to be affected by the release.
    2. If an accidental release of a hazardous substance listed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), the facility must notify the National Response Center (NRC), as well as the SERC and LEPC.
    3. The facility must provide a detailed follow-up written report as soon as practicable after the release. SERCs and LEPCs are required to make these reports available to the public.

STATE

  1. Colorado Disaster Emergency Act of 1992 - Title 24, Article 33.5, Part 701 et. seq., Colorado Revised Statutes, as amended
  2. Colorado State Emergency Operations Plan, 2019
  3. Article IV, Constitution of the State of Colorado; titled the Executive Department
  4. Executive Order D 011 04, National Incident Management System, June, 2009
  5. Public Health Authorities
    1. The County Health Department is authorized and operates pursuant to the Colorado Revised Statutes as amended – Title 25. Public Health and Environment et. Seq.
  6. School District Authorities
    1. School Districts in San Miguel County are authorized and operate pursuant to Colorado Revised Statutes as amended – Title 22. Education et Seq.

LOCAL

  1. Resolution 2006-6 adopting the NIMS and ICS for Incident Management
  2. San Miguel County Political Subdivision Mutual Aid Agreement, Adopted 2013
  3. Emergency Management Resolution 2022-17

 

CONCEPT OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

The general concept on which this document is based represents years of on scene emergency command and control. Each incident is unique and requires different prevention and response measures. Therefore, adhering to the guidelines of NIMS and the National Response Framework (NRF), the County stands ready to meet these challenges.

Every County department or office may be required to respond to an emergency. If a department does not have a specific response role in a given emergency, that department may still be relied upon to support responding departments. The Sheriff/Emergency Manager has responsibility for the direction and control of County resources during an emergency situation that has reached beyond the capabilities of a local jurisdiction.

Upon request, Emergency Management will activate and manage the Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The EOC is the operations area from which response activities can be directed, coordinated and supported. The EOC structure is scalable, based on the magnitude of the situation. If a disaster exceeds County’s resources, assistance will be requested from the private sector, regional agencies, State of Colorado, and if required, federal agencies.

COMPREHENSIVE APPROACH

Emergency Management employs a comprehensive approach to all-hazards planning, and focuses on a collaborative effort with a wide range of partners, a “whole community” approach. This shared responsibility becomes a collection of disciplines that together seek to build a more prepared and disaster resilient community. To support this, Emergency Management performs a support and coordination role, not a command and control function. There are five phases of emergency management: prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery.

  • Prevention efforts attempt to avoid or stop an incident from occurring all together.
  • Mitigation involves actions to minimize or reduce the adverse effects resulting from a disaster.
  • Preparedness encompasses the planning, training, and exercising of emergency equipment, policy, and procedures.
  • Response includes actions taken during the incident to address the immediate and short-term threats to life, property, environment and the social, economic, and political structure of the community.
  • Recovery involves the implementation of programs needed to help communities return to normal. Recovery can be loosely categorized as short and long term actions.

PLANNING ASSUMPTIONS

  • Mutual aid, regional, state, and national resources will be available if requested during a disaster.
  • It is assumed that all county offices, departments and stakeholders will be familiar with this EOP.
  • Where appropriate, county offices, departments and stakeholders are assumed to have in place current mutual aid agreements (or similar documents), establishing parameters and processes for requesting function specific assistance from other jurisdictions or organizations. These agreements are reviewed periodically for update as needed.
  • The Colorado General Assembly has authorized county governments to enter into intergovernmental mutual aid agreements by the provisions of Sections 29-1- 203 and 29-5-101 through 29-5-109, C.R.S.
  • Events that cross jurisdictions will likely result in the establishment of a Unified Command (UC).
  • Other jurisdictions and organizations should have their own current Emergency Operations Plan.
  • Response personnel have the appropriate level of trainings and certifications.
  • Government at all levels must continue to function under all threats, emergency and disaster conditions. Continuity of government/continuity of operations plans should be developed consistent with this plan and in accordance with the State of Colorado Emergency Operation Plans and National level guidance.
  • Town governments and special districts will perform under their scope of authority and responsibility and will make declarations of emergency and disaster to County Emergency Management. All emergency and disaster declarations received by the County will be forwarded to the State of Colorado Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management.
  • San Miguel County government has no fiscal responsibility to any town government or special district after receipt of their emergency or disaster declaration.
  • Town governments, special districts, and non-governmental organizations maintain and update their jurisdictional or response area emergency operations and continuity plans on an ongoing basis and especially during time of an emergency or disaster response. These entities are expected to coordinate their planning, response, and continuity efforts with County Emergency Management.
  • Incidents begin at the County and local government level and will remain the responsibility of the County and local government throughout the incident and through the recovery phase. Generally, local jurisdictions should not plan on the arrival of significant State resources ordered for 24 to 36 hours after the incident. Federal resources may not arrive until 48-72 hours after the incident.
  • An emergency or disaster can occur at any time and any location. It may create a significant degree of human suffering and loss of life, property damage and economic hardship to individuals, government, public services, the environment and the business community.
  • Collaborating and sharing information across multiple levels of government, the response community and the private sector is essential for the successful stabilization and common operating picture of any emergency or disaster.
  • The public expects government to keep them informed and to provide guidance and assistance upon detection of a threat and in the event of an actual emergency or disaster.
  • The premise of the National Response Framework, the State Emergency Operations Plan and this plan is that all levels of government share responsibility for working together in preventing, preparing for, responding to and recovering from the effects of an emergency or disaster event.
  • Identified County offices and departments have clearly understood responsibilities and roles during an emergency or disaster event. Certain county departments have coordination responsibility and authority and cannot necessarily staff an emergency or disaster function without additional staff assistance.

   
COUNTY PROFILE

Figure 1 San Miguel County Map, Source: SMC GIS


San Miguel County is located in southwestern Colorado on the Western Slope. It is bordered to the north by Montrose County, the east by Ouray County, the south by Dolores County and the west by San Juan County, Utah. The County is approximately 1,287 square miles that ranges from southwestern semi-arid high desert to high alpine mountains. Approximately 68% of the land in San Miguel County are public lands and are managed by agencies like the US Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, Colorado State Land Board or Division of Parks and Wildlife.

The County has over 800 miles of maintained state highways and County roads, not including many more miles of trails and bike paths. The County has over 700 miles of waterways and has combined water storage capacity of approximately 21,421 acre-feet in reservoirs, dams and lakes. The San Miguel and the Dolores Rivers are the major rivers in the County.

COUNTY GOVERNMENT

San Miguel County government departments and offices are separated throughout the County. Most departments and offices reside in the County seat of Telluride (BOCC, Assessor, Clerk and Recorder, Planning, Building, IT, GIS, Public Health, Social Services, Attorney, Human Resources and Parks & Open Space). The Sheriff has offices located in the Ilium Valley and in the Town of Norwood.

Other department’s offices are located in the town of Norwood (Finance, Road and Bridge, Social Services extension, CSU extension). Road and Bridge maintenance shops are located in Deep Creek, Norwood, Dry Creek Basin and Egnar.

DEMOGRAPHICS

San Miguel County’s approximate population is 8,179. The Town of Telluride, which serves as the county seat, is approximately 65 miles from the nearest city of any size. San Miguel County has two major highways which serve as the major transportation routes for motorists and freight. Although historically present, there is no railroad service in the County. San Miguel’s main economic bases are tourism and recreation, real estate, construction, hunting, ranching, and mining. San Miguel hosts one of Colorado’s major ski areas at Telluride/Mountain Village.

The incorporated towns of Telluride, Mountain Village, Ophir, Sawpit and Norwood serve as hubs for the County. There are also several small unincorporated communities such as Placerville, Egnar, Lawson Hill, San Bernardo, Slick Rock and Dry Creek Basin. Many of these communities are situated next to Wilderness Areas, Forest Service and BLM lands.

San Miguel County has a regional airport with daily commercial flights throughout the year which increase during the height of ski season. The elevation of Telluride Regional Airport is 9078 feet above sea level. Additionally, the County is a tourist destination year round and has an estimated peak season population of up to 15,000. Population increases are most likely to occur during the three months of the summer tourism season, four months of hunting season and the five months of the ski season.

WATER SUPPLY

The Town of Telluride obtains its drinking water from groundwater that surfaces at the Stillwell Tunnel, four potential surface water intakes in the Bridal Veil Basin (Mud Lake, Lewis Lake, Blue Lake and the Falls Crest Diversion on Bridal Veil Creek) and a surface water intake in the Mill Creek watershed. It has three water treatment plans at Pandora, Mill Creek and Stillwell.

The Town of Mountain Village water is produced by 11 wells in and around the town. These wells average about 140 feet in depth, and during times of high demand, two wells in the San Miguel alluvial aquifer are utilized to augment production.

The Norwood Water Commission derives most of its water supply from the Farmers Water Development Company system (Gurley ditch and reservoir).

The Town of Ophir obtains its drinking water within the Howard Fork sub-watershed from one primary surface water intake off of Waterfall Creek and two backup intakes from two springs collectively known as Warner Springs. Waterfall Creek is tributary to Howard Fork Creek.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND THE TELLURIDE SKI RESORT

San Miguel County is home to several year round annual events. The Telluride Ski and Golf Resort brings thousands of visitors to the area. A variety of festivals are held in the town of Telluride throughout the summer season, bringing a substantial surge population of visitors to the area.

Among the many festivals are Mountain Film (May), Telluride Bluegrass Festival (June), Telluride Fourth of July Celebration, The Ride Festival (July) and Blues and Brews (Sept). The surge population for these events can range from just a few hundred to as high as 25,000.

HAZARD VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT

San Miguel County has conducted an assessment of potential hazards within the County. The assessment details the frequency, vulnerability, exposure and risk of potential hazards to the County and was completed in 2011. The San Miguel County All Hazard Mitigation Plan (AHMP) was developed to reduce and eliminate losses from natural and manmade hazard events and to better protect the people and property of the County from the effects of hazard events.

HAZARD PROFILE

San Miguel County is vulnerable to many hazards, all of which have the potential to disrupt the community, cause damage and create mass casualties. The Hazard Vulnerability Assessment identified specific hazards for the County based on likelihood of occurrence, severity and impact. The findings include the following hazards and their relative risk ranking:

 

HIGH RISK

MEDIUM RISK

LOW RISK

Wildfire

Pandemic Flu

Street Flooding

Drought

Riverine Flooding

Earthquake

Debris Flow/Landslide

Severe Weather

Terrorism

Extreme Winter Weather

Hazardous Material Spill

Ice Jam Flooding

Critical Infrastructure Failure

 

West Nile Virus

 

 

Dam Failure

 

 

Transportation Accidents

 

 

Technological Hazards

 

Perceived Risk Hazards for San Miguel County were grouped into High, Medium and Low Risk categories. Note – the hazards are not ranked in order within each category

VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT

The current All Hazard Mitigation Plan lists the following vulnerability assessment conclusions for San Miguel County:

  1. Wildfire continues to be a significant threat to the County and its residents. This threat is growing with more development in forested areas. The County’s Wildfire Safety Program and Community Wildfire Prevention Plans are proving to be valuable tools to mitigate future losses.
    1. Although human activities, such as lighting campfires, can be responsible for starting wildfires, hotter weather makes forests drier and more susceptible to burning.
      1. Rising temperatures, a key indicator of climate change, evaporate more moisture from the ground, drying out the soil, and making vegetation more flammable.
      2. At the same time, winter snow packs are melting about a month earlier, meaning that the forests are drier for longer periods of time.
      3. As drought and heat continue with rising greenhouse gas emissions, we expect more wildfires in years ahead, especially with the fire seasons getting longer
  2. Flooding will continue to be a threat to existing development within the San Miguel River floodplain. Floodplain management ordinances for Telluride and the County have been effective in reducing risk to future growth in floodplains, but much of the existing Town of Telluride is at risk. Flood insurance is currently the most appropriate mitigation option in Telluride for existing structures, given that the high property values and historic structures in town make acquisition/ elevation projects technically and financially difficult.
  3. Avalanches have been responsible for more lives lost than any other recent hazard, but this is primarily due to unwise backcountry travel. Portions of the Town of Ophir and certain County roads and State Highways are at risk to large avalanches. Avalanches can restrict access into and out of the County on Highway 145 over Lizard Head Pass for days, as well as access in and out of Ophir.
  4. Landslides, mud and debris flows, and rockfall come with the territory of steep, eroding slopes in eastern areas of the County. Debris and mudflows have inundated Telluride twice in the past 100 years. Many of the culverts are undersized to handle a flood and debris flow on Cornet Creek. The County and the Town of Telluride have geohazard regulations in their respective Land Use Codes. Transportation corridors remain at risk and pose safety concerns to travelers and emergency responders. More rockfall control efforts are needed along the State Highways in the County.
  5. Ongoing drought has impacted the tourism and agriculture economies within the County, and contributed to increasing the wildfire hazard in the past, and it will continue to do so in the future. In 2013 the County was designated a primary County for a USDA disaster area.
  6. Problems associated with severe weather and extreme winter weather occur almost every year and exacerbate problems with geologic hazards, avalanches, flooding, and wildfire.
  7. Earthquakes pose a low probability but high consequence event, particularly with the presence of historic building stock located in Telluride.
  8. Transportation routes over mountain passes are susceptible to severe weather avalanches and rockslides, potentially limiting emergency ingress and egress and causing dangerous driving conditions for commuters and tourists. HAZMAT spills will continue to be a concern along transportation corridors. These concerns have been voiced to the Colorado Department of Transportation in the past.
  9. Power outages from severe weather and avalanches are an ongoing concern.
  10. Facilities that store gas, propane, chemicals and other hazardous materials could cause additional health and safety concerns if impacted by a natural or man-caused event, these events can also cause a disruption in the services they provide creating more potential issues.
  11. Many plans, procedures, and policies exist that either promote public safety or wise development procedures within the County and the incorporated towns. Often the implementation of these capabilities is hindered by lack of funding, staffing, political or public pressures, and respect for private property rights.
  12. Public Health Vulnerabilities: Emergencies or disasters may exceed the technical or available resource capability of the San Miguel County Department of Public Health and Environment (SMCDHE) resulting in the need for assistance from other local, state and/or federal resources. An emergency or disaster may cause death and widespread damage, including disruption to the health care system, clinics, emergency care and public health services. It may also disrupt the public infrastructure, compromising water systems, food distribution and storage as well as other infrastructure systems that could lead to a threat to the health and safety of the public. Key personnel may be injured, and others may be delayed in assuming emergency functions until assured of the safety and welfare of their families and homes. Essential available equipment and supplies at the local level may be depleted (source, SMCDHE PHEOP).

CRITICAL FACILITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE

As part of the All Hazard Mitigation Plan (AHMP) planning process critical infrastructure and facilities were identified for the county.

CRITICAL FACILITIES

Critical Facilities are defined as facilities that provide a necessary service before, during, and after times of disaster. These generally include:

  • Airports
  • Fire stations
  • Public safety facilities
  • Schools
  • Governmental buildings
  • Medical centers
  • Shelters
  • Fuel Stations
  • Carrier Neutral Locations (CNLs)
  • Grocery Stores

CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE

Critical infrastructure is defined as assets that are essential to the functioning of a society and economy. These include:

  • Dams, water treatment, water storage, water supply
  • Electric power lines, sub-stations
  • Sewer lines and treatment plants
  • Telephone facilities
  • Internet
  • Communication Towers
  • Transportation routes

CAPABILITY ASSESSMENT

The jurisdictions within San Miguel County have limited response and recovery capabilities due to county size, population and limited emergency responder personnel. Further limitations in these capabilities are determined through annual plan reviews and exercises. The following details mitigation capabilities within the County structure. Mutual Aid Agreements (MAAs) have been established between the political jurisdictions within the county as well as county to county MAAs between neighboring counties, counties within the west all hazard region and the State of Utah.

CEPA Planning Process – Gap Analysis

The Colorado Emergency Preparedness Assessment (CEPA) assists local jurisdictions to obtain a greater understanding of local preparedness levels and to better position the state to support local disaster preparedness, response and recovery efforts. The planning process, performed every three years, assists the County in its efforts to assess risk and local capabilities and the potential need for support and resources during and after emergencies or disasters.

A gap analysis is performed to improve operational readiness and reduce disaster impacts by identifying and reducing or eliminating shortfalls that exist between estimated requirements, standards, and performance measures and the actual response and short-term recovery capabilities.

MULTI-AGENCY COORDINATION SYSTEM

Emergency Management staff facilitate various planning groups within the county. The San Miguel County Multi Agency Coordination (MAC) System is a multiagency, multi-disciplinary planning and coordination group committed to the development and implementation of all- hazards planning for preparedness, prevention, response and recovery from emergencies and disasters. The group meets quarterly to discuss relevant planning issues in the county and is coordinated by Emergency Management. This group also served as the Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC) for hazardous materials preparedness and response. Evaluation of this plan occurs within this group at least every two years.

REGIONAL PLANNING

To facilitate regional planning and mutual aid assistance, Emergency Management staff participate in the West All Hazard Region (WAHR). The WAHR is a six-county all hazard planning region located in the western portion of the State of Colorado. It is comprised of Delta, Gunnison, Hinsdale, Montrose, Ouray and San Miguel Counties.

The WAHR mission is to prepare Colorado’s West Region communities to be resilient in the face of potential threats and hazards through coordination and collaboration. It is a multiagency, multidisciplinary emergency planning and coordination group committed to improve all hazard preparedness and resiliency in the West Region, leading to fewer lives lost, reduced economic impacts in affected communities, improved response capabilities and faster recovery time.

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

The County’s Office of Emergency Management (OEM) addresses planning efforts for the phases of emergency management that include prevention, protection, response, recovery and mitigation. Staff is comprised of the Emergency Management Coordinator and the Emergency Manager.

The OEM provides a structure for anticipating and dealing with emergency incidents and recognizes that disasters are recurring through the four phases of emergency management: preparedness, mitigation, response and recovery.

ALERT AND WARNING SYSTEMS

The Alert and Warning Annex contains more information on the use of alert and warning systems in the County.

CODERED - EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION SYSTEM

The County utilizes a notification system to provide both target-based emergency alerts and general alerts to the public. These alerts can be sent directly to landline phones and to cell phones, if the end user has opted in for this service. Commuters and visitors to the county may also sign up for the system via a mobile application. Residents may self-register on the Sheriff’s Office website: sanmiguelsheriff.org.

SOCIAL MEDIA

The County utilizes social media outlets such as Facebook and Twitter to inform, warn and prepare the public. The authority to initialize this utility as a warning mechanism lies with the incident commander, Sheriff or their designee.

LOCAL MEDIA

The County also utilizes the KOTO, the Telluride-based local radio station, for emergency and general alerts to the public.

IPAWS

The Integrated Public Alert & Warning System (IPAWS) is FEMA's national system for local alerting that provides authenticated emergency and life-saving information to the public through mobile phones using Wireless Emergency Alerts, to radio and television via the Emergency Alert System and on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAAs) Weather Radio network. The authority to initialize this utility lies with the incident commander, Sheriff or their designee.

LOCAL COORDINATION

San Miguel County is responsible for large scale emergency response operations in unincorporated areas of the County, and in cases where the emergency is located within an incorporated area, in cooperation with the Towns of Telluride, Norwood, Ophir and Mountain Village. Each of the Town Governments within San Miguel County, with the exception of Sawpit, has established and adopted both a Chain of Command and Continuity of Operations (COOP) sections for their respective functions as part of their Town Emergency Operations Plans.

All local governments and special districts within San Miguel County are responsible for coordinating with one another and for providing mutual aid within their capabilities and according to the established Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). If necessary, normal working operations may be suspended or redirected during an incident in order to support emergency response and control throughout the County. The Mutual Aid Agreement should be reviewed annually in the MAC meeting.

Based on the assessment of emergency conditions by the designated Incident Commander(s), the Board of County Commissioners (and/or municipal leadership) may be notified and advised of the situation and the need to report to the County EOC.

POLICY GROUP

Based on the assessment of emergency conditions by the designated command structure, the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) and/or members of town leadership may be notified and advised of the situation. If necessary, the BOCC and other identified leadership personnel will comprise the Policy Group, which may gather virtually or be onsite at the various Emergency Operation Centers (EOC) at either the Sheriff’s Annex in Norwood, the Telluride EOC or another appropriate venue. The location of town or county leadership will depend on the type of command structure in place and the incident type. The policy group is not responsible for operational decisions but may have a liaison, usually the county manager, who represents them in the EOC Command structure (see ICS Chart.)

The Policy Group may be called upon to discuss formal declaration of an emergency or disaster, discuss funding for disaster or emergency purposes and formulate necessary directives to County departments and personnel regarding changes in normal duties and/or work schedules. Other possible decisions involving issuance of official orders regarding population protection or temporary social restrictions, such as evacuation orders, establishment of curfews and enactment of price controls may need to be discussed and coordinated by this group.

 

CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS

 

OPERATIONAL PRIORITIES

During an emergency response, such as a natural disaster, County first responders, departments and agencies will prioritize their operational objectives during response and recovery phases in the following order:

  • Life, safety and health of residents, visitors and first responders
  • Property protection – personal property, critical facilities and critical infrastructure
  • Environmental protection
  • Restoration of essential public utilities
  • Restoration of essential programs
  • Coordination amongst local jurisdictions, non-governmental organizations, volunteers and citizen groups.

San Miguel County has resources and expertise available to assist with incident related problems. The County will modify normal operations and redirect resources in order to save lives, relieve human suffering, sustain survivors, protect property and assist in re-establishing essential services. Life-saving and life-protecting response activities have precedence over other emergency response activities.

The Sheriff may request any County department or office able to assist, as well as resources under control of the Sheriff, including San Miguel Search and Rescue, and any agency or entity under agreement with the Sheriff, as well as any mutual aid agency requested by the Sheriff.

DISASTER DECLARATION

All disasters are local, meaning they originate within some county, municipal or special district jurisdiction. The main purpose of declaring a disaster is to request resources beyond the existing capability of the County. By doing so, local government gains access to policies, procedures and agreements that are not necessarily available on a day-to-day basis. It is critical that these disaster policies, procedures and agreements be put in place before an incident impacts the County.

Other reasons for disaster declaration:

  • To gain access to TABOR emergency reserves
  • To qualify for certain types of federal and state disaster assistance
  • To support the enactment of temporary emergency restrictions or controls

INITIAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE

The BOCC authorizes the Office of Emergency Management or their designee to act as needed in the pre-disaster declaration time frame until an official disaster or emergency declaration can be made by authorized individuals.

The OEM, or their designee, have been designated with the authority to spend up to $250,000 in the support of disaster response activities prior to a formalized declared disaster by the Board of Commissioners. Emergency authority consists of ordering and mobilizing resources and/or requesting mutual aid and/or spending to respond to an emergency or disaster.

The Sheriff, or their designee, assumes the emergency duties of Office of Emergency Management staff in the event of the OEM’s absence or inability to act, except in the event of a public health emergency.

COUNTY AUTHORITY

The County Manager, acting as the County’s chief executive officer, has the authority to declare a local disaster.

Until a quorum of the Board has been convened, the County Manager shall have the full legal authority of the Board of County Commissioners.

The Declaration shall not be continued or renewed for a period in excess of seven days except by or with the consent of the Board of County Commissioners. In all events, the County Manager and Board of County Commissioners shall make all reasonable efforts to meet a quorum of the Board within 24 hours of the initial declaration of emergency.

Any order or proclamation declaring, continuing, or terminating a county emergency or disaster shall be filed promptly with the State of Colorado Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management via the Office of Emergency Management. A copy will be maintained by the San Miguel County Clerk and Recorder. Management staff will, as soon as practical, make full notification to the BOCC and County Manager of such actions taken during the pre-disaster declaration period.

DECLARATION PROCESS

Pursuant to the Colorado Disaster Emergency Act, C.R.S. 24-33.5-709:

  • The principal executive officer of a political subdivision has the sole authority to declare a local disaster. It shall not be continued or renewed for a period in excess of seven days, except by or with consent of the governing board of the political subdivision.
  • A disaster declaration shall activate the response and recovery aspects of any and all applicable local emergency plans and to authorize the furnishing of aid and assistance under such plans.
  • Such declaration shall be given prompt and general publicity, and shall be filed promptly with the County Clerk and Recorder, or another authorized record keeping agency, and the Colorado Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management (DHSEM).

GENERAL PROCESS

  1. Response and/or initial damage assessment by local government
  2. Implementation of County EOP and activation of local resources
  3. Resolution by affected local governments declaring a disaster
  4. If necessary, request state assistance – through Emergency Management staff
    1. Implementation of State EOP and activation of state Resources
    2. Situation Reports from County to State
    3. Joint (Federal-State-Local) Preliminary Damage Assessment (PDA)
    4. Governor’s Request for a Presidential Disaster Declaration
    5. FEMA Region VIII Review and Recommendation
    6. Decision by president whether or not to authorize Stafford Act Assistance

COLORADO DISASTER EMERGENCY ACT

The Colorado Disaster Emergency Act (C.R.S. 24-33.5-701 et. seq.) provides the legal and procedural framework for preventing, preparing, mitigating, responding and recovering from disasters in the state of Colorado.

  1. Elected authorities are ultimately responsible for ensuring the safety and security of their citizens, and thus responding to disasters within their jurisdiction. When the disaster exceeds the capabilities of the local jurisdiction, they may call upon assistance from neighboring jurisdictions through Memorandum of Understanding (MOU).
  2. If the disaster is of such magnitude and complexity that it exhausts local capabilities, then according to C.R.S. 24-33.5-709, the “principal executive officer of a political subdivision” may declare a local disaster or emergency.
  3. A local disaster declaration is necessary before a jurisdiction may qualify for state emergency aid. If recognized by the Governor, then the combined resources of the state, including the National Guard, may be drawn upon to respond to the disaster. The Governor, in turn, may request additional resources from other states through the standing Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC).
  4. If the disaster requires federal assistance, the state, via the Governor’s request for a Presidential Disaster Declaration, will function as the primary coordination mechanism for requesting federal assistance.
  5. The Robert T. Stafford Act establishes a process for requesting and obtaining a Presidential Disaster Declaration, defines the type and scope of assistance available from the federal government, and sets the conditions for obtaining that assistance. Based on the Governor's request, the President may declare that a major disaster or emergency exists, thus activating an array of federal programs to assist in the response and recovery effort. Not all programs, however, are activated for every disaster.
  6. Under a Stafford Act major disaster declaration, the local authority having jurisdiction (AHJ) is responsible for all initial payments, and then may submit reimbursement requests for the cost shared amount for eligible expenses. Typically, the federal government takes 75% of eligible expenses, leaving local governments with a cost share of 25% of eligible expenses plus 100% of the ineligible expenses. The state, at the Governor’s discretion, may share in the costs as well.
  7. To be eligible for assistance under the Robert T. Stafford Act, local governments must first perform an initial damage assessment to assess the impact of the disaster. This assessment should provide a rough estimate of the extent and location of damages. This may require the coordination of the various municipal governments who will also perform their own damage assessments. When the information has been collected, it is provided to the EOC and then forwarded to the Colorado Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management (CDHSEM). If warranted, state and federal officials then conduct a joint preliminary damage assessment (PDA) with local officials to further estimate the extent of the disaster and its impact to the community. FEMA uses this information to supplement the Governor’s request for federal assistance.
  8. The Fire Management Assistance Grant (FMAG) is a program within the Stafford Act that provides funds for the mitigation, management, and control of fires on publicly or privately owned forests or grasslands, which threaten such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. The FMAG declaration process is coordinated by the State Division of Fire Prevention and Control (DFPC). The grant program provides a 75% cost share, while the jurisdiction having authority pays the remaining 25%.


PUBLIC HEALTH EMERGENCY OPERATIONS

This San Miguel County Public Health Emergency Operations Plan (PHEOP) was established to promote a system to save lives, protect public health and the environment, alleviate damage and hardship and to reduce future vulnerability within San Miguel County. This document indicates the commitment to annual planning, training, and exercise activities in order to ensure the level of preparedness necessary to respond to public health emergencies or disasters within the County.

The basic plan provides guidance on overall emergency preparedness and concept of operations, departmental roles and responsibilities, the San Miguel County Department of Public Health and Environment (SMCDHE) emergency response organization, PHEOP implementation process, and provides for administrative, training, and exercising requirements. The plan describes the basic strategies and mechanisms by which the department will:

  • Provide command and control for a public health event;
  • Activate public health emergency operations when an incident exceeds the day-to-day operational capacity of the community and/or there is a suspected case of highly transmissible disease;
  • Outline concepts of operation including activities for preparedness, response and recovery;
  • Determine roles and responsibilities for all SMCDHE personnel and other county personnel as needed;
  • Provide suitable disease control measures to limit the spread of disease;
  • Initiate a criminal investigation through the appropriate law enforcement office;
  • Generate, manage and disseminate timely, appropriate information to the public, medical community, response personnel and community leaders; and
  • Smoothly recover to pre-incident operations and decontaminate environments as indicated

Plan annexes are supporting plans to the PHEOP and speak to public health incident response and support. These annexes address the public health response and supports to the 15 National Planning Scenarios in the National Preparedness Goals and hazards identified in the Colorado Hazards Assessments.

DECLARATION OF PUBLIC HEALTH EMERGENCY

The SMCDHE Director or designee will request conference call/meetings with a quorum of the San Miguel County Board of Health (BOH), San Miguel County Emergency Manager and San Miguel County Manager to review the conditions supporting the declaration of a local disaster emergency based on a public health emergency.

All evidence will be presented that supports the declaration of a local disaster emergency and that a significant threat to the health of the community exists. If a quorum of the BOH cannot be met, the County Manager has the authority to declare a local disaster emergency for a period of time not to exceed seven days unless continued by the Board of County Commissioners. The SMCDHE, or their designee, assumes the duties of the County Manager In the event the County Manager is absent or unable to act.

Upon the declaration of the local disaster emergency based on a public health emergency, the SMCDHE EOC will be activated. The San Miguel County EOC may be activated to support the response when a public health emergency is declared. The SMCDHE Director or designee will simultaneously notify the CDPHE of the situation. If necessary, the CDPHE will contact the Governor to request a State Declaration of Public Health Emergency that will allow additional resources to be requested. A declaration of a public health emergency may also come from the Governor in response to events in other regions of the state.

 

DISASTER SPENDING, PROCUREMENT, AND CONTRACTING

The Office of Emergency Management, County Manager, or their designee have been designated with the authority to spend up to $250,000 in the support of disaster response activities prior to a formalized declared disaster by the Board of Commissioners. Emergency authority consists of ordering and mobilizing resources and/or requesting mutual aid and/or spending to respond to an emergency or disaster.

Emergency purchases are exempt from the County’s competitive bid selection process due to the fact that circumstances do not lend themselves to a competitive selection process. As stated in the current San Miguel County Financial Affairs Policy, when threats to public health, welfare or safety exist, County personnel may need to make emergency procurements of construction items, goods, or services.

San Miguel County will maintain disaster finance records including timesheets, receipts, invoices, purchase orders, rental agreements, mileage logs, etc. Copies of these documents are retained per Colorado Open Record Act (CORA) retention laws to justify documentation to DHSEM, DOLA, and FEMA. These documents will be required by FEMA and the State of Colorado to justify claims, purchases and reimbursements due to the County following a disaster.

PURCHASING LIMITS UNDER A DISASTER DECLARATION

A local disaster declaration supersedes non-disaster procurement policies of San Miguel County and the purchasing guidelines detailed herein comply with Title 2, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 200 (2 C.F.R.) as it relates to administrative requirements, principles and audit requirements for federal awards and the San Miguel County Emergency Operations Plan to ensure potential reimbursement, if available.

The Board of County Commissioners authorizes that the purchasing limits for all departments or offices during a local disaster declaration and serving in their Emergency Support Functions (ESF) role shall be as follows:

  • Purchases up to $50,000 are free from any bidding or quote process.
  • Purchases from $50,001 to $250,000 will require at least two (2) quotes if available. The only exception is for imminent lifesaving needs. San Miguel County authorizes the sole source purchase of goods and services only for immediate threats to loss of life.
  • Purchases above $250,000 that are for imminent lifesaving needs are exempt from the formal RFP process. Recommendations for immediate lifesaving purchases must be approved by the Board of County Commissioners in a public meeting with an explanation of why the resources are an imminent need.
  • Any purchases above $250,000 that are not for imminent lifesaving needs must go through the county’s Request for Proposal (RFP) Process as outlined in the latest edition of the San Miguel County Financial Affairs Policy.

Purchasing Limits for Appointed/Elected Officials

Procurement purchasing limits per incident during a local disaster declaration shall be:

  • $250,000 limits for each of the following:
    1. County Manager,
    2. Office of Emergency Management,
    3. Designee in the event the County Manager or Office of Emergency Management staff are absent or unable to act.
  • When requested during a local disaster declaration, the purchasing card spending limits for designated employees may be increased at the discretion of the County Manager, Emergency Manager and/or Finance Director and will be limited to the quantity of those supplies, equipment, materials or services necessary to stabilize the disaster.
  • The County Manager is authorized to move funds within the current San Miguel County budget to address the needs of the incident to the limits set above, which must be ratified at the earliest possible opportunity by the BOCC.
  • If any monies from any county fund or account are spent during a disaster or emergency, the department head/elected official spending the funds is responsible for maintaining detailed records of all items/services purchased during the declaration and must present records, invoices, and any other information related to those procurements to the Finance Department, Emergency Manager and the County Manager no later than ten
  • (10) days after the disaster or emergency is declared to be over. The BoCC may extend this reporting period as needed. It is recommended that copies of all receipts, invoices and serial numbers be recorded with the EOC as they are made so records can be scanned in and/or stored in the documentation unit’s files during the incident.
  • Under a local disaster declaration, the Board of County Commissioners and County Manager shall have access to use of TABOR emergency reserves strictly limited for response efforts associated with the disaster. The county will endeavor to repay funds used to the reserves as soon as possible and the preference is to utilize budgeted funds, state and/or federal disaster assistance funds before drawing on TABOR reserves.

EMERGENCY AND LAND USE AGREEMENTS CONTRACTING

If needed, the Emergency Manager or designee will meet with the land owner and develop a signed agreement for the use of the land needed during an emergency or prior to an emergency. This Land Use agreement will be approved by the County Attorney prior to entering into the agreement. Copies of all agreements, contracts and purchases should be retained and forwarded to the County Attorney’s Office, Finance Director and the Documentation Unit for retention as part of the official record of actions taken during the disaster.

TRACKING DISASTER COSTS

The Finance Department may assign separate general ledger expense line(s) as needed. All purchases must fit the criteria based on the specific incident. Each purchase must have the documentation and invoice attached. The documentation should include an executed Resource Request Form 213RR. All documentation shall be submitted to the Finance Department for payment. The Finance Department will also ensure that the State and Federal procedures are met in the reimbursement process, outlined in the Federal Grant Policies and Procedures manual.

ESTABLISHING BURN RATES

Burn Rates, or the daily costs associated with incident response, should be calculated daily by the responsible entity managing the incident. The Finance Section will be responsible for acquiring the information and submitting it to the EOC Manager as directed.

DISASTER REIMBURSEMENT

The County will follow the procedure in the Disaster Finance Tracking and Reporting section.

REASSIGNMENT OF DUTIES AND EMPLOYEE OVERTIME

In the event of a declared disaster, county employees may be called upon to assist the county in response efforts and other efforts to ensure the continued operation of essential county services. Employees may be reassigned by their department head and/or the County Manager and may be expected to fill an emergency response role that is not part of their daily duties and may be required to work varying shifts and/or work more than 40 hours per week. All department heads and elected officials shall be responsible for maintaining and reporting accurate records of their employees, specifically hours and tasks completed related to the disaster response.

TIMEKEEPING

In order to provide sufficient payroll calculations, deductions, and net pay, supervisors shall ensure that appropriate time card and payroll reporting procedures are followed. Emergency timekeeping may be recorded on ICS forms first and then entered into the established electronic system.

Non-exempt employees, eligible for overtime pay at one-and-a-half times their regular hourly rate after 40 hours per week, are responsible for accurately recording hours spent performing assigned work. Non-exempt employees must accurately record time worked as well as leave time taken for emergencies or personal reasons.

EXEMPT EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION

Exempt employees are designated as disaster service workers during a declared emergency or disaster and are eligible for overtime after 50 hours of work per week. Overtime is paid at one- and-a-half times the exempt employee’s estimated hourly rate.

EMERGENCY STAFF HIRING

Pursuant to a Local Disaster Declaration, the County Manager, elected officials, or the Human Resources Director may conduct emergency hiring of individuals to perform disaster response roles for the county. This includes hiring staff to support the Emergency Operations Center, subject matter experts, equipment operators, public health staff and/or an Incident Management Team (IMT). Emergency hires will be on a temporary basis as needed for the duration of the emergency and shall be covered by the county’s workers’ compensation policy and liability insurance. Temporary employees will not be eligible for county benefits unless otherwise directed by the BoCC or the Human Resources Director. Attempts will be made to conduct background checks on all temporary emergency hires.

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION INSURANCE

San Miguel County employees injured in the performance of their duties or who develop an occupational disease are entitled to benefits under the Colorado Worker's Compensation Act. Workers' compensation insurance is designed to pay for doctors’ expenses as well as other related expenses incurred by employees due to work-related injuries or disease

EMERGENCY CONTRACTING

Pursuant to a Local Disaster Declaration, the County Manager, Elected Official, or Human Resources Director may contract with an organization, agency, or business for professional specialized services or other temporary workforce services or support. Any agency contracts shall be approved by the County Attorney’s Office. Contracted Incident Management Teams or companies must submit completed W9 forms and other requirements as identified in Section 9 of the County Financial Affairs Manual – Entering into Agreement for Services – Independent Contractor.

DISASTER FINANCE TRACKING AND REPORTING

A major disaster or emergency may require the expenditure of large sums of county funds. If the demands exceed available funds, upon prior approval by the BoCC, the county may make additional funds available from contingency and/or emergency reserve funds. If funds are insufficient, the BoCC may grant authorization to transfer and expend monies appropriated for other purposes under a declared emergency or disaster.

  • Participating agencies, county departments and county enterprises are responsible for coordinating with the Finance Department in expending funds, maintaining appropriate documentation to support requests for reimbursement, submitting invoices and closing out assignments in a timely manner.
  • Disaster finance procedures, as coordinated by the Finance Department, will be utilized to ensure the proper and efficient processes relating to procurement transactions, contracts, purchasing card limits and approval authority of the allocation of funds when required during emergencies or disasters.
  • Each county department or office identified in the Plan is responsible for documenting all emergency or disaster related expenditures using the financial tracking and reporting protocol as directed by the county Finance Department. Each county office or department must exercise proper oversight throughout the course of the incident to maintain logs, records, receipts, invoices, purchase orders, rental agreements, and all other applicable documentation.
  • Affiliated agencies identified in the plan shall follow their own financial policies unless their actions result in the expenditure of county funds, in which case county financial policies shall be followed.

NATIONAL INCIDENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (NIMS)

The National Incident Management System (NIMS) is a comprehensive, nationwide systematic approach to incident management. NIMS consists of a core set of doctrine, concepts, principles, terminology, and organizational processes for managing all-hazards incidents. NIMS is applicable to all levels of stakeholders, including local government, non-governmental organizations, private sector, and other agencies that play a role during disasters.

The use of NIMS is required by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the State of Colorado. In San Miguel County, NIMS is the basis for all incident management and is utilized to manage both small and large scale incidents. NIMS require local governments to have an updated Emergency Operations Plan which incorporates NIMS components, principles and policies.

The Incident Command System (ICS) is a component of NIMS. ICS is a flexible personnel management command structure based on “best practices” for safely directing all emergency response activities at the scene of an emergency and is particularly helpful during events that extend beyond routine, single-agency responses.

In this structure, chain of command, span of control and ICS organization principles are utilized. Major areas or capabilities that may impact emergency operations are divided into Emergency Support Functions (ESF), which identify lead and support agencies for each function - this assists in streamlining the assignment of responsibilities.

The NIMS Integration Center encourages plain language for internal operations as it is important to practice every day terminology and procedures that will need to be used in emergency incidents and disasters.

County Adoption

In March of 2006 the San Miguel County Board of Commissioners (BOCC) adopted Resolution 2006-6 regarding the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and its concepts of management of emergencies and disaster incidents. The resolution outlines standardized training requirements for all county employees to comply with the NIMS standards.

ON-SCENE MANAGEMENT - ICS

At the scene of an incident, the County utilizes ICS to guide the organization of response agencies and the execution of tactical priorities. Personnel trained in ICS tactics and strategies can rapidly integrate responding resources, establish interagency liaisons and control resources to avoid duplication or over-commitment of effort.

Incident operations may be directed from the on-scene Incident Command Post (ICP), including emergency personnel, communications, incident planning, public information and resource management. If the event exceeds the capabilities of the ICP, the Incident Commander (IC) may request the activation of all or part of the County Emergency Operations Center (EOC) to assist.

INTEROPERABLE COMMUNICATION

Interoperable communication is critical when responding to any incident. The Interoperable Communication Annex to this plan establishes protocols for emergency communications for local, regional, state and federal agencies during incidents within San Miguel County. The intent is to provide a framework for operations at the Incident Command level to ensure all agencies involved have the ability to maintain, receive and disseminate information.

For established Incident Command/Unified Command (IC/UC) responsibilities all agencies will utilize SMC or TRUG MAC channels for interoperable communication until stability is secured. Communication with regional partners should occur over the phone, via email or through an established talkgroup such as WRICs. Communication with the state should occur over the phone, via email or through an established talkgroup such as OEM W. Should multiple operational periods become necessary, operations will move to established county mutual aid talkgroups.

UNIFIED COMMAND

During large incidents there may be multiple organizations with statutory authority to be in command, have operational control or share legal responsibilities. To increase efficiency and foster coordination, Unified Command should be applied to incidents involving multiple jurisdictions or agencies. Public Health emergencies should always include the County Public Health Director as part of the Unified Command Team.

A Unified Command is an authority structure in which the role of incident commander is shared by two or more individuals, each already having authority from a different agency and/or discipline. The individuals within Unified Command make joint decisions and speak as one voice.

RESOURCE INCIDENT TYPING

Utilizing a numbering system, NIMS/ICS establishes a scale to categorize the size, magnitude, and overall complexity of an incident. On a scale of 1 through 5, with 1 being the most complex, Emergency Management will utilize these levels when assessing EOC activation, staffing needs and EOC goals and objectives. The relationships below illustrate the complexity differences between incident types, and the need for EOC activation levels.


 


Figure 3 Increasing Complexity and Incident Types, FEMA

STATE INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAMS

Coordinated and activated through the Colorado Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management (DHSEM), the Southwest Type 3 Incident Management Team (SWIM Team) provides overhead management of incident operations, operational coordination and support, and fiscal accountability for field-based operations during all-hazards events impacting the County at our request. Other teams may be called in to assist if the SWIM Team is deployed elsewhere.

The CDHSEM Type 3 IMT may be empowered through a delegation of authority to function as the authorized agent of the San Miguel County Board of County Commissioners or the County Sheriff’s Office; as allowed through county, state, federal, and agency cooperative agreements.

EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER (EOC)

The County has identified designated Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs) throughout the County. All locations are multiple-use locations used as conference rooms and/or training areas which are open rooms with movable furniture which can be converted to an EOC quickly in the event of an activation. The purpose of the County EOC is to bring together all the ICS and/or Emergency Support Functions (ESFs) relevant to the disaster or emergency occurring into one central location, improve communication and coordination amongst these agencies and be a central location for resource requests should requests exceed the capability of the dispatch center.

The advantages to first responders, government and the community of activating the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) are numerous. Above all, it allows incident command the ability to focus on incident needs and problem resolution. It provides a central location where government can provide interagency coordination, resources and executive decision making; and facilitates long term operation thereby improving continuity. The San Miguel County EOC is where knowledgeable officials meet in familiar surroundings to play known roles making difficult but necessary decisions based on limited information in limited time.

Personnel assigned to the EOC are expected to have decision-making authority, and have the necessary skills to coordinate their respective organization’s response and recovery activities. Personnel assigned to the EOC should have the ability to acquire and allocate resources associated with their area of expertise. Designated EOC staff should be allowed the time to participate in EOC trainings and exercises, as appropriate. The EOC uses an ICS/ESF model. More information may be found in the EOC Management Guide Annex.

The EOC provides multi-agency coordination through the following functions:

  • Resource support – Identify, acquire, prioritize, and allocate needed and anticipated support resources.
  • Developing and maintaining situational awareness – Information from various sources must be displayed and shared with the appropriate audiences to promote increased understanding and awareness of the current situation.
  • Emergency Support Function (ESF) coordination – The EOC provides coordination and management for ESF’s activated in support of the incident.
  • Manage information – The EOC must have processes in place to collect, document, analyze and distribute information.
  • Policy coordination – Policy directives are reflected within the EOC’s operations.
  • Consequence Management – Consequence management occurs through the consideration of the wider ramifications of an emergency event. This approach moves the focus from a specific hazard, such as a fire or flood, to broader consequences affecting a community, regardless of hazard source.

Figure 4 EOC Operations Structure

EOC Director

The EOC Director (or Unified Commanders) serve as the organizational leader for the EOC for an incident and is the conduit to county leadership, the Policy Group, and the BoCC. The Director is responsible for all operations of the EOC during an incident. The EOC Director is typically the Emergency Manager. When possible, this position should have a deputy director to allow for capacity.

  • Assures EOC procedures are implemented and used correctly
  • Establishes and re-evaluates EOC staffing at effective levels
  • Aligns and re-aligns EOC activation level(s) as the incident progresses
  • Assigns EOC staff positions
  • Communicates with county leadership, the Policy Group and the BoCC
  • Seeks disaster declarations and authorizations for large expenditures as needed
  • Makes sure important functions such as damage assessments, incident intelligence, and other functions are occurring
  • Sends out internal notifications through internal communication systems
  • Monitors EOC staff for effectiveness and fatigue.

Planning

The “Planning” section is comprised of the “thinkers.” They focus on longer term strategic planning, anticipating longer term needs for supporting the incident.

  • Prepare plans for the next operational period.
  • Ask “What could, should, would happen?”

What resources will likely be needed for the next activities?

  • Include appropriate players in future planning.
  • Support Operations, internally identify potential tasks.
  • Prepare long term staffing plans to assure EOC personnel rotate effectively.

Information

The Information Unit is responsible for monitoring communications both internal and external for the EOC as well as working closely with the Director to monitor priority issues.

  • Owns priority Issues through to completion, drives resolution and regularly updates the EOC Director about their progress.
  • Monitors the emergency radio, typically the 800 MHz PPRCN frequencies.
  • Becomes the primary answering point for general phone calls coming into the EOC.
  • Monitors social media and the internet for applicable information.
  • Interfaces and supports Situation Unit – provides updates on applicable social media traffic.

Logistics

The “Logistics” section is tactical in nature, and supports the incident by locating and pricing resources to support the incident. Logistics “owns” the resource request process, and acts as both the initial approval step and final communications with the requestor to communicate approval/denial of the resource. Operations own the delivery of the resource.

  • Validates resource requests: “Is this something the EOC can and should be providing?”
  • Identifies suppliers for requested resources, taking into consideration existing county vendors, working with county Finance to approve new and or alternate vendors as needed.
  • Produces a price estimate for a resource request, making sure the county’s policies and procurement processes are followed.
  • Works with county Finance and/or county attorney to develop new contracts or methods for obtaining resources that are not covered under existing contracts, agreements, or processes.
  • Works directly with Finance, Operations, and the Director to coordinate approval and or more cost effective alternatives for requested resources.
  • Contacts the requestor to communicate approval/denial of resource requests.
  • Coordinates transportation, timing and delivery of resources with the Operations Section.
  • Tracks resources while deployed; documents when, where, and how long each resource is deployed to the incident.

INFORMATION COLLECTION, ANALYSIS AND DISSEMINATION

When activated, the EOC will serve as the central point for collecting, analyzing and disseminating information related to the incident and county needs. Internal communication to county staff and stakeholders is performed using ReadyOp, email and/or cellular devices. Network drives, secure cloud-based drives and WebEOC are some examples of document storage solutions currently in use in the County.

First responders in the field should report to their lead, who will then report to the IC and/or EOC. Incident Command and/or dispatch will relay information to the EOC. At the EOC reports will be deconflicted to ensure there are not duplicate requests for resources and/or conflicting intelligence reports. The EOC will be responsible for entering updates into WebEOC online portal and communicating with the DHSEM Regional Field Manager, DOLA and the State EOC as needed.

The County endeavors to release timely and accurate emergency information to the public concerning emergency preparedness, response and recovery. In an emergency or disaster situation, public information activities will be directed and coordinated virtually via a Joint Information System (JIS) or from the County EOC through a Joint Information Center (JIC).

The JIS should provide clear, concise and accurate information on the existing situation in the affected area and actions being taken by the authorities. Every effort shall be made to minimize and counter rumors, hearsay and half-truth information. Means of information sharing should include, but are not limited to, social media, broadcast media and the county ‘NewsFlash’ publications. Key points to convey may be:

  • The nature of the emergency
  • The location of the emergency
  • How the emergency can affect them
  • What protective action to take
  • Where to get help
  • When the situation will be remedied

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Depending on the size, scale and nature of the emergency, resource ordering will either be managed by one of the dispatch centers, the requesting agency or the EOC. Only the incident commanders of the responsible agency are authorized to request orders. In general, whoever orders a resource is responsible for paying for it. Any orders placed without proper approval will be financial responsibility of the agency that placed the order.

If the request/order is placed by a dispatch center at the direction of the IC or if the requesting agency/IC places this order themselves, the requesting agency is responsible for paying for and tracking the order. If the order is placed by the EOC, then the logistics section will track the order.

All orders placed by the EOC to the state should be placed through WebEOC. All orders placed through the EOC will be initiated with a Resource Request (213RR) form. These forms and the Logistics section tracking systems will be used to track locally or regionally sourced orders.

If Operations and IC encounter operational challenges in which specialized resources are needed, they will coordinate with Plans and Logistics to identify what specialized resources are needed. A Resource Management Plan, when completed, will be an annex to this plan.

Finance

The “Finance” section works with senior leadership, the Policy Group, and the Director to manage the financial aspect of the incident.

  • Validate budget authority.
  • Work with senior leadership, the Policy Group, and the Director to establish financial triggers for per-request and incident aggregate resource costs.
  • Maintain running estimates of costs associated with the incident.
  • Regularly update the Director and County Manager on the estimated incident cost.
  • Monitor resource request pricing and act as the second approval step in the resource request process.
  • Develop a budget for long term incidents and recovery stages.

Operations

The “Operations” section is tactical in nature and supports the incident through direct support of Incident Command along with support of providing other secondary incident support needs.

  • Search and Rescue
  • Structural Firefighting
  • HazMat
  • Public Safety and Security
  • Dispatch
  • EMS/Hospitals
  • Wildland Firefighting
  • Fatality/Coroner

Oversees the operating needs of the incident to include:

  • Directly communicates with field liaisons and IC and acts as a conduit between EOC staff and field liaisons
  • Oversees and reviews all formal resource requests
  • Monitors field responders
  • Extracts incident needs and intel by monitoring radio transmissions and resource requests
  • Delivers products and services approved through the resource request process
  • Identifies needed products and services needed for the incident
  • Updates Director regarding status
  • Tactical implementation – Reviews Requests
    1. Can we do them?
    2. Are there alternatives?
    3. Is this being done already?
    4. Any unintended consequences?
    5. Will the provided resource meet the needs of IC? (Ex. Ordering a piece of equipment without an operator)

Situation Unit

The “Situation Unit” (Sit) is responsible for maintaining situational awareness/incident intelligence for the EOC.

  • Works with the Director to determine update and/or briefing schedule – “Planning P”
  • Collects incident intelligence by conducting regular EOC updates/briefings where each EOC staff member shares the most recent information.
  • Compiles intelligence, displaying the most relevant information on a situation board in the EOC.
  • Directly informs appropriate EOC staff of important developments impacting them.

Expediter

The “Expediter” is responsible for the core functions and administrative support of the EOC during activation.

  • Records personnel hours.
  • Assists with record keeping and incident logging.
  • Supports EOC staff needs by arranging for meals, coffee and other logistical needs.
  • Serve as “runner” to acquire supplies and logistics as needed
  • Provide all documentation and forms to the Documentation Unit to be included in the final incident package

EMERGENCY PROCUREMENT

Emergency purchases, which by their nature or circumstances do not lend themselves to a competitive selection process, are exempt from the County’s competitive bid selection process. As stated in the current San Miguel County Financial Affairs Policy, when threats to public health, welfare or safety exist, County personnel may need to make emergency procurements of construction items, goods or services.

San Miguel County has an established Federal Grant Policies and Procedures Manual. This manual sets forth the policies and procedures used by San Miguel County to administer federal funds pursuant to applicable parts of the Code of Federal Regulations, which took effect for non-federal entities on December 26, 2014. It also includes requirements and references from the federal regulations in the GAO Green Book, Colorado State Programs, Section 602(c) and 603(c) of the Social Security Act, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as well as certain policies and laws pertaining specifically to the county.

The manual contains the internal controls and grant management standards used by the County to ensure that all federal funds are lawfully expended. It describes in detail or references the County’s financial management system, including cash management procedures; procurement policies; inventory management protocols; procedures for determining the eligibility of federal expenditures; time-and-effort reporting; record retention; and monitoring responsibilities. All employees of the County who deal with federal funds in any capacity are expected to review this manual to gain familiarity and understanding of the County’s rules and practices and to comply with all requirements.

PROVIDING ESSENTIAL SERVICES

In accordance with statute, San Miguel County government will continue to provide essential services in order to protect the public health, safety and welfare during an emergency or disaster event by laying out the following chain of command protocols. During a declared emergency or disaster event, the following elected and appointed officials have the authority to execute the powers of the BOCC, in accordance with C.R.S. 30-11-107:

  • BOCC Chairperson (in consultation with the Board if possible)
  • County Manager
  • County Sheriff

In accordance with statute, it is the intent of the San Miguel County Board of Commissioners that County government will continue to provide essential services in order to protect the public health, safety and welfare during an emergency or disaster event by distribution of these disaster chain of command procedures and protocols.

DEPARTMENT HEADS AND ELECTED OFFICIALS’ RESPONSIBILITIES

All County employees are designated as disaster service workers during a declared emergency or disaster and may be required to perform certain emergency services at the direction of their supervisor.

All County Department Heads and Elected Officials will be consulted regarding emergency or disaster event issues that might impact their area of responsibility.

Each agency listed below, department head and elected official shall work within the framework of this plan and supporting Annexes and have the following general responsibilities:

  • Be prepared to respond adequately to all emergency or disaster events;
  • Consider potential emergency or disaster events in the conduct of his or her regular functions, particularly those functions essential in time of emergency;
  • Design preparedness measures to permit a rapid and effective transition period following initial indication of a probable emergency or disaster events;

Protect property and mitigate damages and impacts to individuals, communities and the environment;

  • Facilitate recovery for individuals, families, businesses, government and the environment.

ESSENTIAL SERVICES RESPONSIBILITIES

All County Department Heads and Elected Officials shall ensure the continuity of essential functions in their respective departments in any emergency or disaster event by providing for:

  • Succession to office and emergency delegation of authority in accordance with applicable law;
  • Safekeeping of essential resources, facilities and records;
  • Establishment of emergency operating capabilities
  • Assess essential emergency requirements and plan for the possible use of alternative resources to meet essential demands during and following an emergency or disaster event
  • Participate in activities to continually assess the importance of various facilities and resources to essential community needs; integrate preparedness and response strategies and procedures as needed.

VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT

Volunteer Management during a disaster is critical to the management of community members who want to volunteer their time to help their community. Recent events in the County, such as the COVID 19 response effort, have shown that the community will come together in times of crisis and step forward to help each other.

Depending on the magnitude and scope of a disaster, the need for volunteers and volunteer management will vary, this plan will not attempt to guide all aspects of volunteer management. The county will appoint an individual or local nonprofit (volunteer coordinator) to manage volunteer as needed in order to best serve the needs of the community. The Volunteer Coordinator(s) will serve within the Incident Command/EOC structure and will actively recruit volunteers, manage spontaneous volunteers, assist volunteers in completing paperwork and acquiring the necessary personal protective equipment, signing insurance forms/waivers and taking care of volunteer needs. This may include getting lodging and/or food and drink for volunteers, transportation to and from areas.

RECOVERY

Short term recovery begins as the incident develops, and will often have overlapping effects on response operations. Because of this, short term recovery concepts are covered in the EOP and are coordinated from the EOC. Short term recovery includes the following Recovery Support Functions (RSFs):

  • Expense Tracking – Focuses on the tracking of expenses incurred during the response to the incident.
  • Public Information – Coordinates between field operations and the county Public Information Office.
  • Damage Assessment – Identifies the scope and impacts to the community.

INTEGRATED PLANNING AND PREPAREDNESS

County Emergency Management staff maintains and assists with implementing a three-year Integrated Planning and Preparedness (IPP) plan to develop staff capabilities (knowledge, skills and abilities) and to test and evaluate plans. This provides for a roadmap for continuous improvement of the emergency management program.

For the purposes of this Plan, it is assumed and expected that all County personnel, emergency response agencies and support organizations in San Miguel County have completed the required NIMS/ICS courses. It is also expected that the various levels of management in each agency and organization has completed the level of ICS training appropriate to their respective rank or function. San Miguel County Emergency Management continues to support NIMS compliance programs, by assisting agencies in acquiring appropriate NIMS trainings and assisting with exercise and training development and facilitation.


AGENCY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

GENERAL

Agencies listed below in this plan will:

  1. Understand their agency’s emergency responsibilities identified in the EOP and its supporting annexes/plans, and assign personnel to perform those functions.
  2. Ensure staff complete the required NIMS and ICS Training – typically consisting of ICS 100, 200, 700 and 800 (required for all SMC staff).
  3. Develop and maintain internal policies, procedures, agreements and staffing patterns needed to meet their specific roles and responsibilities identified in the EOP and its supporting annexes.
  4. Develop and implement Continuity of Operations Plans (COOP) to ensure that essential government services are provided to the public.
  5. Consider Access and Functional Needs (AFN) issues so that emergency response and recovery actions support the needs of people with access and functional needs.
  6. Provide a representative to the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) to coordinate their assigned Emergency Support Function (ESF).
  7. Ensuring all staff have a current ID badge with an up-to-date photo.
  8. Keep the Policy Group and EOC updated with key information relating to the response and recovery of the emergency or disaster situation.
  9. Provide area expertise that is part of emergency public information in conjunction with the lead Public Information Officer and the EOC.
  10. Provide personnel to attend EOC meetings, trainings and exercises – as appropriate.
  11. Maintain records for all disaster/emergency-related expenses, for tracking and disaster cost recovery in conjunction with county disaster finance polices and in collaboration with the Finance Office.
  12. All offices (of elected officials), departments, agencies and organizations with responsibilities identified in this section of the plan are responsible for developing internal procedures for carrying out these roles and responsibilities.

COUNTY SHERIFF

  • Implementation of the Incident Command System (ICS), including determining the locations of Incident Command Post (ICP) and establishing necessary positions and functions (i.e., planning, finance, logistics, operations and public information).
  • Assessment of emergency conditions and determination of required levels of immediate assistance.
  • Implementation of available public warning measures.
  • Conducts and coordinates search and rescue operations.

Determination of the need for population evacuations and provision of instructions to uniformed peace officer personnel regarding evacuation operations.

  • Coordination of communications and provision of communications staff support for field command post(s).
  • Assessment of emergency conditions and determination of required levels of assistance from County and outside sources.
  • Provision of security measures, traffic control and access control within the disaster area(s) and in other areas of the County.
  • Provision of aviation support to include Search & Rescue, rapid transportation and aerial observation.
  • Provision of security measures at ICP, EOC, temporary emergency shelters, temporary morgues, and in evacuated and disaster-impacted areas, if available.
  • Coordination of wildland fire suppression in unincorporated areas of San Miguel County.
  • Coordination of uniformed reserve forces.
  • Hazardous materials incident response and incident control in unincorporated areas, in conjunction with DERA.
  • Maintenance of departmental ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT STAFF

  • Assessment of emergency conditions and determination of required levels of assistance from County and outside sources.
  • Assessment of emergency conditions and determination of required levels of immediate assistance.
  • Coordination of resources to support the Incident Commanders’ requirements.
  • Activation and management of the San Miguel County Emergency Operations Center (EOC).
  • Coordination of mutual aid assistance.
  • Emergency situation assessment and recommendations to Sheriff and County Commissioners concerning the need for local disaster declarations, travel restrictions, curfews or other temporary social restrictions.
  • Implementation of available public warning measures.
  • Provision of emergency public information and establishment of procedures for releases of disaster-related information to news media, to include casualties.
  • Establishment of locations for temporary shelters, in cooperation with the American Red Cross.
  • Establishment of communications with Colorado EM for purposes of providing situation reports and forwarding requests for State assistance via WebEOC and other resources.
  • Notification of emergency personnel (maintenance of contacts outside the Sheriff's Office).

Preparation of situation reports and damage assessment reports for Emergency Management Director, County Commissioners and Colorado DHSEM.

  • Development and maintenance of Continuity of Government and Continuity of Operations plans.
  • Coordinate support for resource management, damage assessment, intergovernmental coordination, disaster recovery, hazard mitigation and other emergency management functions, as needed.
  • Coordination of volunteer amateur radio resources used for backup communications.
  • Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s).
  • Plan maintenance, scheduling and conducting of training and exercises.

OPERATIONS – PEACE OFFICERS

  • Implementation of the Incident Command System (ICS).
  • Determination of location(s) in the field for Incident Command Post(s).
  • Assessment of emergency conditions and determination of required levels of assistance from County and outside sources.
  • Activation and management of the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) if needed.
  • Coordination of mutual aid assistance.
  • Provision of emergency public information and establishment of procedures for releases of disaster-related information to news media, to include casualties.
  • Determination of the need for population evacuations and provision of instructions to uniformed peace officers, fire, and emergency medical personnel regarding the conduct of evacuation operations.
  • Hazardous materials training, planning, response and cleanup in cooperation with fire agencies.
  • Photographic and or video record of damage.
  • Investigative support to National Transportation Safety Board/FAA and other investigative agencies in man-made disasters.
  • Commitment of personnel as directed to assist with evacuation, shelters and Coroner’s Office support.
  • Establishment of measures for animal control, including the coordination of animal relief measures, the assurance of their care, and the search for their owners.

SEARCH AND RESCUE

  • Provision of trained personnel and equipment in support of search and rescue operations of the San Miguel County Sheriff’s Office.
  • Traffic control assistance to fire, EMS and uniformed peace officer personnel.
  • Crowd control assistance and assistance with site security.
  • Provide Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT) Search Teams for avalanche victims.

CORRECTIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS (CCS) DIVISION

  • Coordination of all wired and radio communications.
  • Provision of communications staff support for field Command Post(s).
  • Provision of EOC technical support.
  • Commitment of other divisional deputy personnel to assist as needed and directed.
  • Provision/coordination of transportation resources and services.
  • Provision of logistics support (food service, blankets, etc.), in cooperation with the American Red Cross.
  • Provide security for EOC.


COMMISSIONERS AND DEPARTMENTS

All county employees may be called upon to perform duties outside their day-to-day activities in order to support county emergency operations.

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

  • Issuance of formal requests to the Governor’s Office through the Colorado Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management (DHSEM) for the declaration of a state emergency for the purposes of obtaining state and/or federal assistance.
  • Approval and commitment of County resources and funds for disaster or emergency purposes.
  • Formulation of directives to County departments and personnel regarding changes in normal duties/work schedules, temporary reassignments, and employment of temporary workers, as needed (implemented by County Manager).
  • Intergovernmental liaison and initiation of formal requests for outside assistance from other local jurisdictions.
  • In coordination with Incident Command, issuance of official orders regarding population protection or temporary social restrictions, such as evacuation orders, establishment of curfews, and enactment of price controls.

COUNTY MANAGER

  • Approval of County resources and funds for disaster or emergency purposes.
  • Coordination, commitment and direction of San Miguel County government activities in support of emergency or disaster response and relief efforts.
  • Issuance of directives to County departments and personnel regarding changes in normal duties/work schedules, temporary reassignments, and employment of temporary workers, as needed.
  • In coordination with Incident Command, designate an emergency public information officer (PIO) for the County and establishment of procedures for coordinated and consistent releases of disaster related information to the media and the public.
  • Maintenance of departmental ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.
  • Approval of County resources and funds for disaster or emergency purposes.
  • Participation with other departmental representatives on the County damage assessment team at EOC and on local/state field damage survey teams, (primarily for County owned facilities), as needed.
  • Facilitate restoration of County public facilities, services and utilities. Assist with Emergency Operations as needed.
  • Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s).
  • Maintenance of departmental ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.

HUMAN RESOURCES

  • Working with Emergency Management, ensure staff are adequately prepared for crises through training, ensuring security and safety initiatives are taken to protect employees in the event of a crisis.
  • Assisting with responses to OSHA.
  • Coordinating communication between insurers and benefit providers.
  • Crafting internal and external communications.
  • Managing pay and benefits for disrupted employees.
  • Handling compliance questions related to travel, relocation, remote-work and
  • temporary employees.
  • Responding to concerns about work rules, job descriptions, temporary employees and discipline.
  • Obtaining medical information about employee casualties.
  • Providing documentation of training, procedures, personnel and other records to investigating agencies as needed.
  • Cooperating with incident command to implement best practices
  • Coordinating responses between unemployment compensation, workers’ compensation, OSHA, EEOC, arbitration and insurer/benefit responses.

COUNTY ATTORNEY

  • Provision of legal counsel and assistance to County Commissioners and to other County officials before, during and after disaster and emergency incidents in the County.
  • Draft and/or review emergency contracts, memoranda of understanding and intergovernmental agreements.
  • Preparation of legal documents (disaster declarations, resolutions or regulations required to facilitate emergency operations).
  • Assist with Emergency Operations as needed.
  • Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s).
  • Maintenance of departmental ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.

FINANCE DEPARTMENT

  • Prepare documents necessary to recover monies from insurance providers, State/Federal Disaster Assistance Programs, or other funds or combinations of funding sources.
  • Facilitate medical care and compensation for injured County employees through Workmen’s Compensation Plans.
  • Procurement of emergency-related supplies and materials and administration of vendor contracts for emergency services and equipment.
  • Resource tracking, record-keeping and documentation of disaster-related costs and financial commitments.
  • Participation with other departmental representatives on the County damage assessment team at EOC and on local-state field damage survey teams, as needed.
  • Establishes and maintains an incident related financial record keeping system.
  • Assist with Emergency Operations as needed.
  • Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s).
  • Maintenance of departmental ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT)

  • Coordinates local actions to provide the required telecommunications and the restoration of the telecommunications infrastructure.
  • Supports all County agencies in the procurement and coordination of telecommunication services from the telecommunications and information technology (IT) industry during an incident response.
  • Provision of information services and telecommunications support to EOC and if necessary, the Incident Commander.
  • Provide necessary IT equipment and set-up for disaster-related activities.
  • Assist with Emergency Operations as needed.
  • Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s).
  • Maintenance of departmental ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS (GIS)

  • Provide situational and incident maps to the Incident Commander or Emergency Management or response workers as needed.
  • Provide mapping services to Emergency Management and other departments and offices as needed.
  • Coordinate capabilities to locate and assess affected properties with the Assessor’s Office.
  • Provide for GIS services to support the EOC and Emergency Management as needed.
  • Maintain databases of essential services and critical infrastructure, including county buildings and local hazards.
  • Maintenance of departmental ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT

  • In coordination with Incident Command, organization of outside health resources providing assistance to San Miguel County, in cooperation with EMS agencies.
  • Assistance to ICP/EOC staff in assessing overall health and medical resource needs during response and recovery operations and maintenance of situation status information within the ICP/EOC.
  • Provision of environmental health services and technical support, including the identification of chemical hazards, sources of contamination, or unsanitary conditions that present health hazards to the general public.
  • Environmental Health Officer serves as a member of the County Damage Assessment Team.
  • Assist with Emergency Operations as needed.
  • Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s).
  • Maintenance of departmental ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.

ROAD AND BRIDGE DEPARTMENT

  • Removal of debris, clearance of public right-of-ways, and planning for street/route recovery operations, with priority assigned to critical emergency services lifelines.
  • Provision of personnel and heavy rescue equipment in support of search and rescue operations.
  • Provision of personnel, equipment, supplies and materials for wildfire, flood control and flood hazard mitigation measures.
  • Restoration of damaged County roads and bridges and other public services and facilities.
  • Participation with other departmental representatives on the County damage assessment team at EOC and on local/state field damage survey teams, primarily County-owned transportation infrastructure, as needed.
  • Assist with Emergency Operations as needed.
  • Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s).
  • Maintenance of departmental ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.

PLANNING AND BUILDING DEPARTMENT

  • Participation in long-term disaster recovery and hazard mitigation planning to ensure the compatibility of community redevelopment plans and hazard mitigation measures with the comprehensive County land use plan and other community development plans.
  • Assist with Emergency Operations as needed.
  • Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s).
  • Development and maintenance of Continuity of Government and Continuity of Operations Plans.
  • Maintenance of departmental ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.
  • Provision of personnel for structure and facility inspections to determine safety of individual structures (businesses, residences and public buildings), including during rescue operations and to identify needed repairs (or to implement condemnation procedures when necessary).
  • Participation with other departmental representatives on the County Damage Assessment Team at EOC and on local/state field damage survey teams, as needed.
  • Participation in long-term disaster recovery and hazard mitigation planning to ensure the compatibility of community redevelopment plans and hazard mitigation measures with the comprehensive County Land Use Plan and other community development plans.
  • Provide public education materials related to community disaster recovery and reentry by citizens into disaster-impacted structures and neighborhoods (e.g., safety of stored goods, removal of mildew, cleaning of smoke damages, etc.).
  • Assist with Emergency Operations as needed.
  • Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s).
  • Maintenance of departmental ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.

SOCIAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT

  • Assist the American Red Cross, Salvation Army and other volunteer organizations in the provision of emergency shelters, temporary housing and other assistance to displaced citizens.
  • Assist in the coordination of overall efforts of volunteer organizations and other volunteers, in coordination with Colorado Volunteer Organizations Active in Disasters (COVOADS).
  • In coordination with Incident Command, management of resources of exigent or spontaneous volunteers (i.e., match available resources with individual needs).

Assist with the transportation needs of disabled individuals, senior citizens, and other groups with special needs.

  • Provision of resources for stress counseling/crisis counseling for disaster victims and disaster relief workers, as needed.
  • Administration of Individual and Family Grant Program in presidentially declared disasters in San Miguel County.
  • Working with the County Manager, coordinates available County staff to accomplish emergency functions.
  • Assist with Emergency Operations as needed.
  • Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s).
  • Maintenance of ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.

OPEN SPACE DEPARTMENT

  • Assist with Mass Care activities.
  • Assist with Emergency Operations as needed.
  • Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s).
  • Maintenance of departmental ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.

COUNTY FACILITY MAINTENANCE

  • Restoration of public facilities and buildings to normal use.
  • Support and coordination of utilizing County facilities and buildings as emergency shelters.
  • Assist with Emergency Operations as needed.
  • Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s).
  • Development and maintenance of Continuity of Government and Continuity of Operations plans.
  • Maintenance of departmental ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.

HOUSING AUTHORITY

  • Assist other agencies with the provision of emergency shelters, temporary housing and other assistance to displaced citizens.
  • Contribution of personnel, records, and other resources to support damage assessment function (participation on EOC damage assessment team).
  • Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s).
  • Maintenance of departmental ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.

 

ELECTED OFFICIALS

COUNTY ASSESSOR

  • Contribution of personnel, records and other resources to support damage assessment functions.
  • Participation on the County Damage Assessment Team.
  • Assist with Emergency Operations and/or support as needed.
  • Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s).
  • Maintenance of ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.

COUNTY CORONER

  • Is responsible for all duties associated with deceased individuals within the boundaries of the County.
  • Provision of temporary morgue and mortuary services.
  • Identification, verification and disposition of deceased victims.
  • Protection of personal effects with the deceased at the time of death.
  • Identification, verification, autopsies (if determined by Coroner, as necessary) and disposition of deceased persons.
  • Notification of relatives of deceased persons.
  • Provide information about fatalities to Command Staff as needed.
  • Assist with emergency operations and/or EOC as needed.
  • Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s), to include development and maintenance of a Mass Fatalities Plan working with emergency management staff.
  • Maintenance of ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.

CLERK AND RECORDER

  • Provide for safekeeping of vital records.
  • Receipt and filing of any orders or proclamations declaring, continuing or terminating a San Miguel County emergency or disaster.
  • Assist with Emergency Operations as needed.
  • Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s).
  • Maintenance of departmental ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.

COUNTY TREASURER

  • Assist with Emergency Support as needed.
  • Provide and maintain financial records.
  • Assist with Emergency Operations as needed.
  • Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s).
  • Maintenance of departmental ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.

 

AFFILIATED AGENCIES

CHIEF TOWN PEACE OFFICER OR TOWN DESIGNEE

  • Implementation of the Incident Command System (ICS).
  • Determination of location(s) in the field for Incident Command Post(s).
  • Assessment of emergency conditions and determination of required levels of assistance from County and outside sources.
  • Activation and management of the Municipal Emergency Operations Center (EOC) if needed.
  • Coordination of mutual aid assistance.
  • Provision of emergency public information and establishment of procedures for releases of disaster-related information to news media, to include casualties.
  • Determination of the need for population evacuations and provision of instructions to uniformed peace officers, fire, and emergency medical personnel regarding the conduct of evacuation operations.
  • Emergency situation assessment and recommendations to Town Officials concerning the need for local disaster declarations, travel restrictions, curfews or other temporary social restrictions.
  • Establishment of communications with Colorado DEM for purposes of providing situation reports and forwarding requests for State assistance through the County Emergency Manager.
  • Provision for security and traffic control within the disaster area(s).
  • Formal declaration of a local disaster or emergency and issuance of other official orders regarding population protection and temporary restrictions, including evacuation orders, establishment of curfews, and enactment of price controls.
  • Approval and commitment of Town resources and funds for disaster/emergency response and recovery.
  • Establishment of intergovernmental liaison in multijurisdictional incidents, including coordination of emergency efforts with San Miguel County Emergency Management Director (furnish representative to San Miguel County EOC, when possible).
  • Assist with Emergency Operations as needed.
  • Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s).
  • Maintenance of departmental ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.

DISTRICT ATTORNEY’S OFFICE

  • Prioritize cases and court proceedings as appropriate during the disaster or emergency.
  • If routine procedures may result in public safety concerns, determine alternative procedures.
  • Work with the Sheriff's Office to release or relocate incarcerated individuals, as needed.

FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT (EMS) CHIEFS AND/OR DIRECTORS

  • Establish and manage emergency plans consistent with the County EOP to support operations as necessary during an emergency.
  • Coordinate with County Emergency Management to support supplies, resources, personnel, access etc., as requested.
  • Implementation of the Incident Command System (ICS).
  • Determination of location(s) in the field for Incident Command Post(s).
  • Assessment of emergency conditions and determination of required levels of assistance from County and outside sources.
  • Provide Hazardous Material Incident response.
  • Activation and management of the Municipal Emergency Operations Center (EOC) if needed.
  • Coordination of mutual aid assistance.
  • Provision of emergency public information and establishment of procedures for releases of disaster-related information to news media, to include casualties.
  • Emergency situation assessment and recommendations to County and/or Town Officials concerning the need for local disaster declarations, travel restrictions, curfews or other temporary social restrictions.
  • Establishment of communications with Colorado DEM for purposes of providing situation reports and forwarding requests for State assistance through the County Emergency Manager.
  • Assist in implementation of emergency evacuation operations.
  • Provision of triage, extrication, medical treatment, to include field coordination of emergency transportation to hospitals.
  • Provision of heavy rescue services.
  • Provision of onsite emergency medical facility for minor injuries.
  • Provision of fire suppression, fire causation, and arson investigation services.
  • Provide a representative to the unified ICP and EOC.
  • Hazardous Material Incident response.
  • Assist with Emergency Operations as needed.
  • Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s).
  • Maintenance of departmental ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.

COLORADO STATE PATROL

  • Provide perimeter security for the scene.
  • Provide access and egress for emergency vehicles and needed personnel (establish one-way routes).
  • Provide Hazardous Material Incident response.
  • Assist with Emergency Operations as needed.
  • Provide a representative to EOC and or ICP as needed.

AMERICAN RED CROSS / SALVATION ARMY

  • Provision of immediate assistance to disaster victims, including food, water, shelter, clothes, physical and mental health counseling and referrals.
  • Establishment and management of emergency shelters for mass care, in cooperation with San Miguel County Social Services Department and affected municipalities, including registration, feeding, lodging, and responding to public inquiries concerning shelter residents (establish public inquiry telephones).
  • Provision of temporary and immediate housing for displaced disaster victims.
  • Provision of food, beverages and other assistance to emergency response personnel and emergency relief workers.
  • Provision of damage assessment information upon request.
  • Coordination of mental health services (in cooperation with San Miguel County Social Services Department.
  • Assist with Emergency Operations as needed.

TELLURIDE REGIONAL AIRPORT

  • Coordinate air transport assets in the movement of emergency resources, supplies, equipment, and personnel.
  • Coordinate air transport assets in the movement of displaced or injured citizens.
  • Provision of firefighting equipment and personnel for appropriate fire related incidents.
  • Provision of Airport facilities for use as temporary shelter and morgue.
  • Maintenance of departmental ability to manage response and recovery support operations using command and management principles as outlined in the National Incident Management System.
  • Assist with Emergency Operations as needed.

REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTERS

  • Clinics should provide a liaison during EOC activations to help coordinate response efforts and logistical/staffing support, as well as planning and operational expertise, for the emergency.

SCHOOL DISTRICTS

  • Provide for the safety and protection of pupils and school personnel, through planning and training exercises with local public safety organizations.
  • Provide transportation support for evacuation and other lifesaving purposes, as requested.
  • Coordinate with designated shelter management personnel when use of the schools is directed for emergency care requirements (i.e., feeding and/or sheltering).
  • Assist with Emergency Operations as needed.
  • Development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s).
  • Development and maintenance of Continuity of Government and Continuity of Operations Plans.


APPENDICES

ESFS, CORE CAPABILITIES AND LIFELINES

FEMA created Community Lifelines to reframe incident information, understand and communicate incident impacts using plain language, and promote unity of effort across the whole community to prioritize efforts to stabilize the lifelines during incident response. The interrelationship of Emergency Support Functions (ESF), Core Capabilities, and lifelines can be thought of in terms of means, ways and ends.

  • Means: ESFs and other organizing bodies—the means—are the way we organize across departments and agencies, community organizations to enhance coordination and integration to deliver the Response Core Capabilities.
  • Ways: Response Core Capabilities describe the grouping of response actions—the ways—that can be taken to stabilize and re-establish the lifelines. FEMA executes Lines of Effort (LOE) to operationalize the Core Capabilities (the ways) for response and recovery planning and operations.
  • Ends: Lifelines describe the critical services within a community that must be stabilized or re-established—the ends—to alleviate threats to life and property

EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTIONS

FEMA’s National Response Framework (NRF) established the Emergency Support Functions (ESFs) framework to structure response to disasters. The basic ESF structure includes 15 ESFs which exist to guide the coordination and response of responding agencies, departments and support agencies. ESF lead agencies may be transferred to another governmental agency based on incident needs. Any transfer of primary responsibility for an ESF must be approved by Unified Command and/or the EOC Manager.

Each ESF section recognized here identifies the primary and support agencies/departments pertinent to the ESF. A lead agency or department has been designated for all ESFs. The ESF lead directs supporting agencies and departments in preparedness planning and coordination/collaboration during response activities. The following is a summary of the Emergency Support Functions as identified in the National Incident Management System and utilized the State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management.

P1076#yIS1

 

 

Figure 5 Emergency Support Functions

 

 

 

TRANSPORTATION – ESF 1

Lead Agency: Road and Bridge Department

Support Agencies: Town Public Works Departments, Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT)

Support and assist town, County, private sector and voluntary organizations requiring transportation for an actual or potential Incident of Critical Significance. This group ensures all roads and conduits into and out of an affected area remain open, and that the traffic allowed into those areas is coordinated in a manner that prevents bottlenecking and gridlock which would prevent needed emergency assistance reaching those areas that need it.


COMMUNICATIONS – ESF 2

Lead Agency: County IT, SMSO Communication Center

Support Agencies: County IT, County EM, Town IT, WestCO Regional Dispatch Coordination with telecommunications and information technology industries, restoration and repair    of    telecommunications   infrastructure, protection, restoration, and sustainment of national  cyber and information  technology resources. Oversight of  communication within incident management.

Communication Centers ensure the mechanism(s) to alert and warn in support of response efforts during a large-scale incident are operational. May be responsible for the issuance of warning information regarding impending hazards, as well as the maintenance of warning networks which might be used by the County in an emergency.


PUBLIC WORKS AND ENGINEERING – ESF 3

Lead Agency: Road and Bridge Department

Support Agencies: Town Public Works Departments, CDOT

Coordinates and organizes the capabilities and resources of the town and County governments to protect critical road and building infrastructure, provide technical assistance, engineering expertise, construction management, debris removal and other support to prevent, prepare for, respond to, and/or recover from a large-scale incident.

 

FIRE FIGHTING – ESF 4

Lead Agency: County Sheriff, Fire Districts

Support Agencies: Road and Bridge, Town Public Works

Enable the detection and suppression of wildland and urban fires resulting from a large-scale incident.

 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT – ESF 5

Lead Agency: Emergency Management

Support Agencies: County Manager, Town Managers, IT

Responsible for supporting overall activities of the county government for county incident management as well as assistance to support town overall activities as requested to include disaster intelligence, providing situational awareness, public information and damage assessment. Responsible for coordination of alert and warning.

 

MASS CARE, HOUSING AND HUMAN SERVICES– ESF 6

Lead Agency: Social Services Director

Support Agencies: Emergency Management, Red Cross, County Departments 

Supports Countywide, town and non-governmental organization efforts to address nonmedical mass care, housing and human services needs of individuals and/or families impacted by a large-scale incident.

 

RESOURCE SUPPORT – ESF 7

Lead Agency: Emergency Management, Sheriff’s Office

Support Agencies: Town Public Works Departments, Colorado Department of Transportation

Supports volunteer services, County agencies, and town governments tracking, providing, and/or requiring resource support before, during and after a large scale incident. This group is responsible for the acquisition of all types of resources that are identified following a disaster.

HEALTH AND MEDICAL SERVICES – ESF 8

Lead Agency: Department of Public Health and Environment

Support Agencies: County Sheriff, Coroner, EMS, Medical Centers, Mobile Crisis Provider, Mental Health Facilities

Provide the mechanism for coordinated County assistance to supplement municipal resources in response to public health and medical care needs (to include behavioral health issues) for potential or actual large scale incidents and/or during a developing potential health and medical situation.

 

SEARCH AND RESCUE – ESF 9

Lead Agency: County Sheriff, Search and Rescue 

Support Agencies: Fire Protection Districts

This group coordinates local search and rescue operations.

 

OIL AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS – ESF 10

Lead Agency: Telluride Fire Protection District, County Sheriff

Support Agencies: Telluride Hazardous Material Response Team, Colorado State Patrol HazMat

Coordinate County support in response to an actual or potential discharge and/or uncontrolled release of oil or hazardous materials incidents

 

AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES – ESF 11

Lead Agency: Extension Office, Natural Resources 

Support Agencies: SMC DPHE, State Veterinarian

Supports County and authorities and other agency efforts to address: control and eradication of an outbreak of a highly contagious or economically devastating animal/zoonotic disease; assurance of food safety and food security and; protection of natural and cultural resources and historic properties.

 

ENERGY ASSURANCE– ESF 12

Lead Agency: Emergency Management, IT 

Support Agencies: Utility Companies

This group is concerned with the restoration of the utility (electrical and gas) infrastructure following a disaster, as well as the provision of temporary emergency power capabilities to critical facilities until such time as a permanent restoration is accomplished.

 

PUBLIC SAFETY AND SECURITY– ESF 13

Lead Agency: County Sheriff, Local LEAs 

Support Agencies: Colorado State Patrol

Integrates County public safety and security capabilities and resources to support the full range of incident management activities associated with potential or actual Incidents of a large scale incident such as traffic control, security control, evacuation and prisoner management.

 

CROSS SECTOR BUSINESS & INFRASTRUCTURE – ESF 14 

Lead Agency: County Manager, Assistant CM

Support Agencies: Social Services, Town Managers, Various

ESF 14 provides the framework for government to coordinate with other municipal governments based upon the assessment of incident impacts, support may vary depending on the magnitude and type of incident and the potential for long term and severity of consequences. ESF 14 may be activated in the short term for large scale or catastrophic incidents requiring state and federal assistance. ESF 14 is intended to be a transition mechanism when long term recovery is necessary. ESF 14 will collect information and strive to assemble assessment level information to establish a recovery committee, if necessary. The needs of housing, businesses and employment, economic development, master planning, community infrastructure, and social services are best addressed in a recovery plan specific to the emergency or disaster event. ESF 14 is also responsible for donations management.

 

EXTERNAL AND PUBLIC INFORMATION – ESF 15

Lead Agency: Emergency Management, SMSO PIO 

Support Agencies: County Manager

Ensures that sufficient County assets are deployed to the field during a potential or actual large scale incident to provide accurate, coordinated, and timely information to affected audiences, including governments, media, the private sector and the public. This group is the mechanism through which state and local government provides disaster relief assistance to victims in the affected area(s), including the Individual and Family Grant program, the Small Business Administration's loan programs, the administration of unemployment compensation, and various other disaster relief programs available for both Presidentially-declared and non- Presidentially declared disasters.

 

EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTIONS CONTACTS

ESF # 1

Transportation and Infrastructure POC: Ryan Righetti 970-729-1907 POC: Tom Hannahs 970-708-0016

POC: Alan Hatfield 970-708-0035

POC Agency

San Miguel County Road and Bridge

San Miguel County Road and Bridge San Miguel County Road and Bridge

ESF # 2

Communications

POC: Sean Krentsa 970-708-9457 POC: Pete Petranovich 970-708-8929

POC: WestCO Supervisor 970-249-9110

POC Agency

San Miguel County IT

San Miguel County Sheriff’s Office WestCO Dispatch Center

ESF # 3

Public Works and Engineering

POC: Ryan Righetti 970-729-1907

POC Agency

San Miguel County Road and Bridge

ESF # 4

Fire Fighting

POC: John Bennett 970-729-2411 

POC: John Bockrath 970-729-0934

POC Agency

Telluride Fire Protection District Norwood Fire Protection District

ESF # 5

Emergency Management

POC: Shannon Armstrong 970-729-3497 

POC: Jennifer Dinsmore 970-596-3100

POC Agency

San Miguel County Sheriff’s Office San Miguel County Sheriff’s Office

ESF # 6

Mass Care and Sheltering

POC: Carol Friedrich 970-708-4402 POC: Karen Bellerose 970-369-8699

POC Agency

SMC Dept. of Social Services San Miguel Sheriff’s Office

ESF # 7

Logistics – Resources Ordering

POC: Shannon Armstrong 970-729-3497 

POC: Jennifer Dinsmore 970-596-3100

POC Agency

San Miguel County Sheriff’s Office San Miguel County Sheriff’s Office

ESF # 8

Public Health and Medical

POC: Grace Franklin 970-708-8342 

POC: Pam Foyster 970-708-0033

POC Agency

SMC Dept. Health and Environment SMC Dept. Health and Environment

ESF # 9

Search and Rescue - Rural

POC: Todd Rector 970-729-0528 

POC Agency

San Miguel County Sheriff’s Office San Miguel County Sheriff’s Office

ESF # 10

Oils and Hazardous Materials

POC: John Bennett 970-729-2411

POC Agency

Telluride Fire Protection District Telluride Fire Protection District

ESF # 11

Agriculture and Natural Resources

POC: Starr Jamison 970-369-5441

POC Agency

SMC Dept. Natural Resources

ESF # 12

Energy

POC: Alex Shelley 970-209-5593

POC: Brien Gardner 970-417-9972

POC Agency

SMPA

Blackhills Energy

ESF # 13

Public Safety & Security

POC: Bill Masters 970-729-2025 

POC: Josh Comte 970-708-1785

POC: Chris Broady 970-729-3447

POC Agency

San Miguel County Sheriff’s Office Telluride Marshal's Dept.

Mountain Village Police Dept.

ESF # 14

Cross Sector Business & Infrastructure

POC: Mike Bordogna 970-708-8648 

POC Agency

San Miguel County Administration

ESF # 15

External Affairs and Public Information

POC: Shannon Armstrong 970-729-3497

POC Agency

San Miguel County Sheriff’s Office


CORE CAPABILITIES

The National Preparedness Goal describes five mission areas — prevention, protection, mitigation, response and recovery — and 32 activities, called core capabilities, that address the greatest risks to the nation. Each of these core capabilities is tied to a capability target. These targets recognize that local government needs the flexibility to determine how they apply their resources, based on the threats that are most relevant to them and their communities.

Prevention - Prevent, avoid or stop an imminent, threatened or actual act of terrorism.

Protection - Protect our citizens, residents, visitors, and assets against the greatest threats and hazards in a manner that allows our interests, aspirations and way of life to thrive.

Mitigation - Reduce the loss of life and property by lessening the impact of future disasters.

Response - Respond quickly to save lives, protect property and the environment, and meet basic human needs in the aftermath of a catastrophic incident.

Recovery - Recover through a focus on the timely restoration, strengthening and revitalization of infrastructure, housing and a sustainable economy, as well as the health, social, cultural, historic and environmental fabric of communities affected by a catastrophic incident.

P1156#y1

Prevention Mission Area Core Capabilities

Planning – Conduct a systematic process engaging the whole community as appropriate in the development of executable strategic, operational, and/or community-based approaches to meet defined objectives.

Public Information and Warning – Deliver coordinated, prompt, reliable, and actionable information to the whole community through the use of clear, consistent, accessible, and culturally and linguistically appropriate methods to effectively relay information regarding any threat or hazard, as well as the actions being taken and the assistance being made available, as appropriate.

Operational Coordination – Establish and maintain a unified and coordinated operational structure and process that appropriately integrates all critical stakeholders and supports the execution of core capabilities.

Forensics and Attribution – Conduct forensic analysis and attribute terrorist acts (including the means and methods of terrorism) to their source, to include forensic analysis as well as attribution for an attack and for the preparation for an attack in an effort to prevent initial or follow-on acts and/or swiftly develop counter-options.

Intelligence and Information Sharing – Provide timely, accurate, and actionable information resulting from the planning, direction, collection, exploitation, processing, analysis, production, dissemination, evaluation, and feedback of available information concerning threats to the United States, its people, property, or interests; the development, proliferation, or use of WMDs; or any other matter bearing on U.S. national or homeland security by Federal, State, local, and other stakeholders. Information sharing is the ability to exchange intelligence, information, data, or knowledge among Federal, State, local, or private sector entities, as appropriate.

Interdiction and Disruption – Delay, divert, intercept, halt, apprehend, or secure threats and/or hazards.

Screening, Search, and Detection – Identify, discover, or locate threats and/or hazards through active and passive surveillance and search procedures. This may include the use of systematic examinations and assessments, sensor technologies, or physical investigation and intelligence.

Protection Mission Area Core Capabilities

Planning – Conduct a systematic process engaging the whole community, as appropriate, in the development of executable strategic, operational, and/or community-based approaches to meet defined objectives.

Public Information and Warning – Deliver coordinated, prompt, reliable, and actionable information to the whole community through the use of clear, consistent, accessible, and culturally and linguistically appropriate methods to effectively relay information regarding any threat or hazard and, as appropriate, the actions being taken and the assistance being made available.

Operational Coordination – Establish and maintain a unified and coordinated operational structure and process that appropriately integrates all critical stakeholders and supports the execution of core capabilities.

Access Control and Identity Verification – Apply a broad range of physical, technological, and cyber measures to control admittance to critical locations and systems, limiting access to authorized individuals to carry out legitimate activities.

Cybersecurity – Protect against damage to, the unauthorized use of, and/or the exploitation of (and, if needed, the restoration of) electronic communications systems and services (and the information contained therein).

Intelligence and Information Sharing – Provide timely, accurate, and actionable information resulting from the planning, direction, collection, exploitation, processing, analysis, production, dissemination, evaluation, and feedback of available information concerning threats to the United States, its people, property, or interests; the development, proliferation, or use of WMDs; or any other matter bearing on U.S. national or homeland security by Federal, State, local, and other stakeholders. Information sharing is the ability to exchange intelligence, information, data, or knowledge among Federal, State, local, or private sector entities as appropriate.

Interdiction and Disruption – Delay, divert, intercept, halt, apprehend, or secure threats and/or hazards.

Physical Protective Measures – Reduce or mitigate risks, including actions targeted at threats, vulnerabilities, and/or consequences, by controlling movement and protecting borders, critical infrastructure, and the homeland.

Risk Management for Protection Programs and Activities – Identify, assess, and prioritize risks to inform Protection activities and investments.

Screening, Search, and Detection – Identify, discover, or locate threats and/or hazards through active and passive surveillance and search procedures. This may include the use of systematic examinations and assessments, sensor technologies, or physical investigation and intelligence. 

Supply Chain Integrity and Security – Strengthen the security and resilience of the supply chain.

 

Mitigation Mission Area Core Capabilities

Planning – Conduct a systematic process engaging the whole community as appropriate in the development of executable strategic, operational, and/or community-based approaches to meet defined objectives.

Public Information and Warning – Deliver coordinated, prompt, reliable, and actionable information to the whole community through the use of clear, consistent, accessible, and culturally and linguistically appropriate methods to effectively relay information regarding any threat or hazard and, as appropriate, the actions being taken and the assistance being made available.

Operational Coordination – Establish and maintain a unified and coordinated operational structure and process that appropriately integrates all critical stakeholders and supports the execution of core capabilities.

Community Resilience – Lead the integrated effort to recognize, understand, communicate, plan, and address risks so that the community can develop a set of actions to accomplish Mitigation and improve resilience.

Long-Term Vulnerability Reduction – Build and sustain resilient systems, communities, and critical infrastructure and key resources lifelines so as to reduce their vulnerability to natural, technological, and human-caused incidents by lessening the likelihood, severity, and duration of the adverse consequences related to these incidents.

Risk and Disaster Resilience Assessment – Assess risk and disaster resilience so that decision makers, responders, and community members can take informed action to reduce their entity’s risk and increase their resilience.

Threats and Hazard Identification – Identify the threats and hazards that occur in the geographic area; determine the frequency and magnitude; and incorporate this into analysis and planning processes so as to clearly understand the needs of a community or entity.

Response Mission Area Core Capabilities

Planning – Conduct a systematic process engaging the whole community as appropriate in the development of executable strategic, operational, and/or community-based approaches to meet defined objectives.

Public Information and Warning – Deliver coordinated, prompt, reliable, and actionable information to the whole community through the use of clear, consistent, accessible, and culturally and linguistically appropriate methods to effectively relay information regarding any threat or hazard and, as appropriate, the actions being taken and the assistance being made available.

Operational Coordination – Establish and maintain a unified and coordinated operational structure and process that appropriately integrates all critical stakeholders and supports the execution of core capabilities.

Critical Transportation – Provide transportation (including infrastructure access and accessible transportation services) for response priority objectives, including the evacuation of people and animals, and the delivery of vital response personnel, equipment, and services into the affected areas.

Environmental Response/Health and Safety – Ensure the availability of guidance and resources to address all hazards including hazardous materials, acts of terrorism, and natural disasters in support of the responder operations and the affected communities.

Fatality Management Services – Provide fatality management services, including body recovery and victim identification, working with State and local authorities to provide temporary mortuary solutions, sharing information with mass care services for the purpose of reunifying family members and caregivers with missing persons/remains, and providing counseling to the bereaved.

Infrastructure Systems – Stabilize critical infrastructure functions, minimize health and safety threats, and efficiently restore and revitalize systems and services to support a viable, resilient community.

Mass Care Services – Provide life-sustaining services to the affected population with a focus on hydration, feeding, and sheltering to those who have the most need, as well as support for reunifying families.

Mass Search and Rescue Operations – Deliver traditional and atypical search and rescue capabilities, including personnel, services, animals, and assets to survivors in need, with the goal of saving the greatest number of endangered lives in the shortest time possible.

On-Scene Security and Protection – Ensure a safe and secure environment through enforcement and related security and protection operations for people and communities located within affected areas and also for all traditional and atypical response personnel engaged in lifesaving and life-sustaining operations.

Operational Communications – Ensure the capacity for timely communications in support of security, situational awareness, and operations by any and all means available, among and between affected communities in the impact area and all response forces.

Public and Private Services and Resources – Provide essential public and private services and resources to the affected population and surrounding communities, to include emergency power to critical facilities, fuel support for emergency responders, and access to community staples (e.g., grocery stores, pharmacies, and banks) and fire and other first response services.

Public Health and Medical Services – Provide lifesaving medical treatment via emergency medical services and related operations and avoid additional disease and injury by providing targeted public health and medical support and products to all people in need within the affected area.

Situational Assessment – Provide all decision makers with decision-relevant information regarding the nature and extent of the hazard, any cascading effects, and the status of the response.

 

Recovery Mission Area Core Capabilities

Planning – Conduct a systematic process engaging the whole community as appropriate in the development of executable strategic, operational, and/or community-based approaches to meet defined objectives.

Public Information and Warning – Deliver coordinated, prompt, reliable, and actionable information to the whole community through the use of clear, consistent, accessible, and culturally and linguistically appropriate methods to effectively relay information regarding any threat or hazard and, as appropriate, the actions being taken and the assistance being made available.

Operational Coordination – Establish and maintain a unified and coordinated operational structure and process that appropriately integrates all critical stakeholders and supports the execution of core capabilities.

Economic Recovery – Return economic and business activities (including food and agriculture) to a healthy state and develop new business and employment opportunities that result in a sustainable and economically viable community.

Health and Social Services – Restore and improve health and social services networks to promote the resilience, independence, health (including behavioral health), and well-being of the whole community.

Housing – Implement housing solutions that effectively support the needs of the whole community and contribute to its sustainability and resilience.

Infrastructure Systems – Stabilize critical infrastructure functions, minimize health and safety threats, and efficiently restore and revitalize systems and services to support a viable, resilient community.

Natural and Cultural Resources – Protect natural and cultural resources and historic properties through appropriate planning, mitigation, response, and recovery actions to preserve, conserve, rehabilitate, and restore them consistent with post-disaster community priorities and best practices and in compliance with appropriate environmental and historic preservation laws and executive orders.


COMMUNITY LIFELINES

A community lifeline enables the continuous operation of critical government and business functions. FEMA’s National Response Framework incorporates the Community Lifelines concept and stresses the importance of stabilizing lifelines at all levels of response to lessen threats and hazards to security, the economy and public health and safety.

 FEMA developed the community lifelines to increase effectiveness in disaster operations. The State of Colorado has also implemented the use of Community Lifelines to better respond to catastrophic events. The implementation of Community Lifelines in this plan allows response officials to characterize the incident and identify the root causes of priority issue areas and then distinguish the highest priorities and most complex issues from other incident information.

 Together, the community lifelines reframe incident information to provide decision makers with root cause and impact analysis. Emergency Support Functions and Community Lifelines guide how county departments, first response agencies, municipalities and partner agencies will work together in support of the EOC and the community.

Lifeline or Component Condition – By Color

Unknown: Grey – Indicates the extent of disruption and impacts to lifeline services is unknown

Unstable: Red – Indicates lifeline services disrupted and no solution identified or in progress (Unstable, no solution in progress)

Stabilizing: Yellow – Indicates lifeline services disrupted but solution in progress with estimated time to stabilization identified (Unstable, solution in progress)

Stable: Green – Indicates lifeline services are stabilized, re-established, or not impacted (Stable). Green Components may still be severely impacted

Administrative: Blue – Does not indicate an operational status or condition; it is used for administrative purposes, such as presentations and briefings


PROMULGATION (ADOPTION RESOLUTION)

 

 

 

RECORD OF CHANGES

All changes are to be annotated on the master copy of the Emergency Operations Plan maintained by Emergency Management staff. Any significant changes will be shared electronically with the applicable stakeholders. Minor changes and required additions will be reviewed and incorporated into the plan during scheduled annual updates.

 This Plan will be updated annually through the All Hazard Planning Group, and as needed after any incident, to ensure that it remains an effective and accurate emergency management tool for officials, responders and citizens of San Miguel County.

DATE                                      SECTION CHANGE OR UPDATE                                REVISED BY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECORD OF DISTRIBUTION

This document shall be known as the San Miguel County Emergency Operations Plan. This Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) is approved and hereby ordered electronically distributed. All agencies, departments and personnel should review and accept their respective responsibilities as outlined in this plan, including organizational planning and training necessary to implement the plan when required. A hard copy will be kept in the primary and secondary Emergency Operations Centers, the Commissioner’s Office and the Sheriff’s Office.

Upon adoption, this EOP has been electronically distributed to county officials and departments, town governments and any identified stakeholders for their respective use as well as for planning and training purposes. They are listed below.

Jurisdiction                                                   Name

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DISASTER DECLARATION RESOLUTION TEMPLATE

SAN MIGUEL COUNTY, COLORADO

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS LOCAL DISASTER EMERGENCY DECLARATION

WHEREAS, the San Miguel County Sheriff and/or Emergency Manager and/or the Public Health Director has advised the Board of County Commissioners of San Miguel County (“the Board”) and/or the County Manager of a disaster (as that term is defined in Part 21 of Article 32 of Title 24, C.R.S.) currently present in the unincorporated area of San Miguel County, Colorado (“County”) to wit, the occurrence or imminent threat of widespread or severe damage, injury or loss of life or property resulting from (add details of event) requiring emergency action to avert danger or damage, which

occurred on                     (inclusive period of incident); and

WHEREAS, Colorado law provides for declaring a local disaster emergency to assist local governments in responding to and recovering from emergency events, including epidemics, and “activates the response and recovery aspects of any and all applicable local and interjurisdictional disaster and emergency plans and to authorize the furnishing of aid and assistance under such plan” C.R.S. § 24-33.5-709(2); and

WHEREAS, pursuant to C.R.S. § 24-33.5-709(1), a local disaster emergency may be declared only by the principal executive officer of a political subdivision and shall only be valid for a period not to exceed seven days unless by or with the consent of a majority of the members of the Board of County Commissioners; and

WHEREAS, the Board of County Commissioners has designated the County Manager as the County’s principal executive officer pursuant to Resolution 2022-17; and

WHEREAS, the cost and magnitude of responding to and recovery from the impacts of the above referenced event is expected to be far in excess of the County’s available resources; and

WHEREAS, it is appropriate and in the interests of the public health and safety, and would further protect property, for the County Manager to declare a local disaster emergency at this time.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the County Manager hereby declares a local disaster emergency for San Miguel County, Colorado, pursuant to C.R.S. 24-33.5-709(1), as may be amended.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, the effect of this declaration is to activate the response and recovery aspects of any and all applicable local and interjurisdictional disaster emergency plans and to authorize the furnishing of aid and assistance under such plans.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that such activation will provide resources to support the delivery of credible, accurate, and reliable information to empower the public to slow the spread of the disease while living their lives with minimal disruption.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, pursuant to Resolution #2022-14, which references that emergency purchases when there is a threat to public health, welfare and safety are exempt from a competitive purchasing process, continues to be in full force and effect.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that Emergency Meeting protocol as set forth in Resolution #2018-026 remains in full force and effect.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that San Miguel County encourages people to remain calm and to base their actions on credible sources of information.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that this declaration shall be given prompt and general publicity and shall be shall be sent to the County’s Office of Emergency Management to be filed promptly with the Colorado Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management and with the Clerk and Recorder of San Miguel County.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that this declaration shall be valid until                  at unless further extended by the San Miguel County Board of County Commissioners.

AM/PM MST

DONE THIS

day of             202_, at Telluride, San Miguel County, Colorado.

 

SAN MIGUEL COUNTY, COLORADO COUNTY MANAGER

By:                                                       Mike Bordogna

 

 

 

ATTEST:

Carmen Warfield, Chief Deputy Clerk to the Board

  

Email to State EOC WatchCenter@state.co.us and fax to DHSEM 720-852-6750

Copy to the Emergency Management staff em@sanmiguelsheriff.org

 

 

PLAN MAINTENANCE, TRAINING AND EXERCISES

Responsibility for maintenance and regular updates of this plan rests with Emergency Management staff within the San Miguel County Sheriff’s Office. San Miguel County Emergency Management will also provide for regular exercises and training sessions to ensure that provisions of the plan are well understood by all departments and offices with assigned responsibilities.

Departments, offices and other organizations with responsibilities identified in the plan are responsible for ensuring that their staff is familiar with provisions of the plan and adequately trained to carry out emergency assignments. Staff participation in periodic exercises provides the best opportunities for refining plans and procedures in preparation for actual disaster and emergency events. Multi-agency and multi-jurisdictional exercises will be coordinated by the Emergency Management staff.

INTEGRATED PREPAREDNESS PLANNING

 San Miguel County uses the Integrated Preparedness Planning (IPP) cycle which establishes overall preparedness priorities and outlines a multi-year schedule of preparedness activities designed to address those priorities and validate county capabilities. It also serves to coordinate preparedness activities across organizations in order to maximize the use of resources and prevent duplication of effort.

PLAN UPDATES

This Emergency Operations Plan will be updated at least annually through the MAC Group or as needed after any incident to ensure it remains an effective, accurate emergency management tool for leaders, responders and citizens of San Miguel County.

REPORT  UPDATES,  SUGGESTIONS  OR  ISSUES  WITH  LINKS  IN  THIS  PLAN  TO  EMERGENCY

MANAGEMENT STAFF VIA EMAIL em@sanmiguelsheriff.org.